Are bone grafts necessary after a tooth extraction, or only if getting an implant?

Very beneficial. In highly, esthetic areas, grafting should be done. If there is a large bony defect, it should be grafted. Tooth replacements look better in grafted areas. Non esthetic areas, or areas there will never be replacements do not need grafting.
Probably. Bone grafts can be beneficial if an implant is to placed. The grafts act as a scaffold, resorb and ultimately are replaced by your own bone or form a bridge with your bone. If an implant is not planned it will be beneficial to place a graft which isn't resorbed, one in which will remain for an extended period and support the adjacent native bone, providing a better esthetic, functional prosthesis.
Sometimes. We do it sometimes without a planned implant. We do it to preserve the size and shape of the area when a bridge is planned.
Good idea. The advantage of "socket or ridge preservation", also called a bone graft , is the filling in of the hole where the tooth was extracted. This keeps the area nice and full and can be very helpful both to the teeth surrounding it and in the future if you elect to have an implant. Very good idea and investment for small cost.
Yes. Bone grafts is like an insurance policy. It increases the chance of the extraction site healing fully with bone so that the implant can be encased in good strong bone. It increase the stability of the dental implant.
No and maybe yes. Bone grafts facilitate the healing of the bone tree height that allows implants replaced later time. If a bridge is to be used, the graft can make the false tooth configuration much improved. Incomplete bone healing is a serious problem in replacing extracted teeth. Bone grafts have been a valuable improvement in oral surgery, allowing options to exist. Even dentures when first placed benefit.

Related Questions

Is my dentist pushing me to get a bone graft/implant after my tooth extraction for the money? Or is it absolutely necessary?

If. If the area where the tooth was removed is compromised, bone graft/implant/crown may be the best "fix." Yes, it's expensive, but it''s worth the time, effort, and money. Generally missing teeth should be replaced. To not do so results in additional tooth loss over time. Not being able to examine you I would recommend that you get a second opinion if you don't have a trusting relationship. Read more...
2nd opinion. If you are uncertain, get a second opinion -- see a specialist - the Prosthodontist. In most cases, an implant is the optimum treatment for a lost/missing tooth - especially in someone your age with their whole life ahead and the need for function, esthetics, and bone preservation. Good Luck. Read more...
28 Teeth. Forgetting your wisdom teeth, you should have 28 other healthy, functioning teeth (or replacements). If teeth are not replaced, the other teeth will shift resulting in an uneven bite, periodontal problems, and esthetic issues. It will cost more to correct later than now. The advice your dentist gave you is sound and correct, and follows the standard of care. The choice is yours. Read more...
I don't think so. because if needed as part of a dental implant, the cost of a bone graft is generally included in the quoted price for the implants. It is absolutely necessary. Read more...

I had #19 and #3 tooth extraction/bone graft 6 days ago. What is my risk for dry socket? How long until I can be sure that I won't get dry socket?

Dry Socket. You should be out of the woods and fine at this point. . Read more...
Not long. Keep the area clean; gentle salt water rinse in the extraction areas. Once the sites are healed over your risk is reduced to minimal. Read more...
Almost zero. After six days the tissue has really started to heal. Since you had the sockets packed with grafting material, covered with a membrane, and sutured closed, your chances of a dry socket are almost nil. Read more...
No-risk. Bone grafting at the time of extraction gives the bony socket a special framework on which your new bone cells can grow with much less re-contouring of the surrounding bone. There is almost no risk for dry socket. Read more...
Low. By 6 days chance of dry socket minimal. Don't smoke. Avoid alcohol. You should be OK. Make sure to talk to your Dentist about tooth replacement before adjacent and opposing teeth destabilize. Read more...

How long after teeth extraction/bone graft on left and implant on right side can you safely eat more than liquid or soft food.?

Eating solid food . If implants are submerged or bone level the soft tissue will grow over them in couple of days during the healing process and you will be able to resume eating your regular food . Right now avoid hard and spicy food.Please follow the instructions given to you after the surgery. Read more...
USUALLY 4-7 DAYS . Generally, gently brushing over the area and rinsing with warm salt water starting the day after the surgery usually keeps the area pretty clean. Typically, the patients can gradually advance their diets to a normal diet by the 4-7 day, depending on how they feel. Read more...
Depends on surgery. It really depends on the nature of the surgeries. If the extraction is healing normally, it is probably safer to eat on that side rather than where an implant was placed. I prefer not to work on both sides of the mouth at the same time, for this reason. It is nice to give a patient one side for function. Sometimes, active infections do not allow this approach and caution is indicated. Read more...
It depends. The best thing to do is to wait for the tissue to completely close over the wound to be sure the area is sealed. You can check on this yourself. Depending on the difficulty of the extraction and your body's healing this can take a few days or over a week. The wound closure is the most important factor. If bone particles were used, they can shift even after the tissue is closed. Be careful! Read more...
Include Fresh Juices. Many soft food choices are nutritionally sound. Most cannot match the vitamins and minerals found in fresh veggies and some fruits. These can be a challenge right after surgery. I suggest taking advantage of the popular trend of drinking green juices. Adding apple and carrot can make them more palatable. They are nutrient dense and can support tissue healing. Read more...

Should I have sensitivity to cold after a tooth extraction and bone graft?

Post Ext sensitivity. Is probably due to an adjacent tooth as a result of the surgery or coincidentally. See your own dentist who can examine you and give you an accurate answer and advice. Read more...

Having tooth extraction and bone graft/"sinus bump" on monday and I'm terrified. What should I expect?

Ask the surgeon. This is best answered by the surgeon who knows you, your medical and dental history, and your specific circumstances. Generally speaking you should be completely numb for the procedure and therefore not feel anything. Again, generally speaking, as with any surgical procedure there should be some discomfort and possibly slight bleeding which is easily handled with medications. Call the surgeon. Read more...
No pain. I am sure you are going to have anesthesia. Expect no pain during the procedure. If you think you are feeling something tell the dentist so he or she can make you comfortable. After you canhave some discomfort and swelling. You should be given instructions after you are done along with medications for any pain. Read more...
Headache. Generally, the worst part of the procedure is when the "bump-up" occurs, that is, when the lower border of your sinus is pushed up to create space for the bone graft. This is usually done by tapping an instrument up against the lower bony border. Often, patients complain of a headache later on. The dentist who is doing the procedure should be able to answer all you questions and concerns. Read more...
Minor discomfort. Most of our patients says that the sounds are really worse than the procedure. Mostly you will just feel the pressure of the movement of the procedure if you have proper anesthesia (as long as there isn't a major infection). The little "sinus bump" may feel a little strange but should not hurt. If you are really "terrified" ask about premeditation or about"twilight sleep" availability. Read more...
Depends. All depends on what the "sinus bump" is. If it is an osteotome technique, then you will feel tapping pressure as the bone is used to reshape the sinus contour in the area. The instrument confines the bone and compacts it as it pushes the bone upward into the sinus area, bringing the lining with it. Expect to be very numb. The extraction socket is usually then filled with some kind of graft. Read more...
Take it easy. With an extraction and graft, you can expect some postoperative pain and may want to take it easy for a couple of days before resuming normal activity. Be sure to follow the instructions of your surgeon. Read more...
Don't be concerned. Not exactly sure what you mean by sinus bump. If you are having a sinus lift after the extraction in order to better prepare the site for an implant, this should be a relatively simple procedure. Normally the post op is not all that uncomfortable. Be prepared for a day or so of discomfort but basic pain meds should easily take care of it. Nothing to be afraid of. It always sounds worse than it i. Read more...
May need antibiotics. You might need antibiotics due to localized infection. Go back to your doctor and get it checked. Read more...
Swelling and pain. Tis is a surgical procedure. So you can expect some swelling and some slight discomfort. You should be aware that you can also experience a nose bleed which can occur when you enter the sinus with an implant procedure. Read more...
Ask for sedation. You should have this procedure done by a well trained and reputable specialist. If you are nervous, they can sedate you. The procedure should be done a-traumatically, as to be kind to the remaining bone and grafted area. So by definition the surgery needs to be very meticulously performed to avoid trauma and infection . You may be swollen and tender in the region for a week or so. Read more...
Don't be Terrified. It sound's more scary than it really is. Let the clinician know that you would like the dental assistant place her right hand flat on your forehead and left hand fingers pinching your bridge of the nose near the eyes when he starts to lift the sinus. This takes the sting off from the procedure. From what you wrote it seems that the provider is gonna carry out the lift using osteotomes. Read more...
Don't worry. I've had a similar procedure myself. You'll have some soreness. Nothing more. I had my procedure at 10 am and was in my office, seeing patients by 2 pm! you might need some ice for a couple of hours and maybe an otc analgesic (like advil) for the soreness. Read more...
Not much. If you are very nervous ask about being sedated. What you are having done souns like a sinus lift procedure which is done to grow bone to eventually place a in implant. Absent sedation you will hear noises but you can wear headphones and listen to music to block that out. Speak to your dentist about sedation and make your concerns known so you will have a better experience. Read more...
YOu will be fine. Usually the procedure is routine for an oral surgeon. Often patients may have some discomfort for a day or 2. We perform such procedures often in our office and patients do very well. However, I do understand your anxiety. If so, consider sedation for the procedure and this will make everything easy and simple. Good luck. Read more...
Mild discomfort. Surgeon will be very careful to extract the tooth atraumatically, least amount of force necessary. The bone graft should healnicely and be uneventful. Read more...
Depends. Depends on the expertise of the operator. Is this a specialist who has done many of these before or is it a general dentist who does this "once in awhile"? Read more...
Not as bad as you th. It should not be as bad as you think, there is going to be some swelling, and discomfort maybe for 1-2 days, but controlable easy with pain medication. Do not worry. Read more...
Easy as Pie ! The procedure is very simple, predictable, and painless. After the tooth is removed, the surgeon will gently 'tap' the floor of the sinus, creating space for a small amount of bone to be added. The implant will be placed and you'll have a couple stitches. You'll be numb, comfortable, and have minimal post-op discomfort. Keep smiling ! Read more...

Are bone grafts required after tooth extraction?

Not required... If you want to support the gum tissue or for to support an implant in the future, then it's a good idea. Read more...
Not always. For routine extractions, especially when there is adequate bone all around the socket where the tooth was extracted, there is no reason for a bone graft. However, when there is loss of bone from periodontal disease or an infection and the area is to be replaced with a restoration, especially a dental implant, bone grafts are advisable. It may be done at the time of surgery or at a later date. Read more...
Depends. It depends on the goal. If a dental implant is planned, then yes. Sometimes, bone grafts can be performed at wisdom tooth sites and where lesions of the jaw bone were removed. Consult with your dentist. Read more...

How long after tooth extraction/bone graft should the pain subside?

Post-surgery. Greatest pain level first 2 days post-surgery, then should gradually di is his daily over 10 days to 2 weeks. Follow your Dentist's post-op instructions to the letter. If you have any concerns, call for an appointment for reevaluation. Read more...