About how much does it cost for lasek eye surgery for nearsightedness?

Varies. As with many purchases the cost varies based on the options. It can cost anywhere from $1000 to $2500 per eye or more. This depends on geographic location, technology offered, reputation and length of vision guarantee if any etc.
Varies. Cost of lasek varies significantly depending on location. Call your closest laser center to get accurate pricing. In my area, it costs between $3600-4800.
Cost of LASEK vLASIK. Because lasek is newer noncutting technology and fewer surgeons know how to perform it it's usually a few hundred dollars more per eye than lasik. But lasek is always safer so i think it's worth the price premium.

Related Questions

About how much does the lasek eye surgery really cost?

Varies. National average is just over $2000 per eye. Beware of discount centers which offer very low prices. This is only possible with substandard equipment and inexperienced surgeons. Read more...
Cost of LASEK. A few thousand dollars per eye. A few hundred dollars more per eye than the older cutting lasik procedure. Less than a decade of further contacts and eyeglass use! Read more...

Can I get lasik eye surgery to correct my nearsightedness?

There are. Parameters that must be measured to see if you would be a good candidate for lasik. You need to see an ophthalmologist to measure these parameters then determine if you could have it done. Correcting the distance vision will make it so you will need glasses to focus to read, close up. Read more...

Should I get lasik eye surgery to correct my nearsightedness at age 18?

You can. You certainly do not have to have lasik to improve your vision, but by 18 you become a candidate for the procedure (assuming that your prescription has not been changing significantly and there are no other issues related to your eyes). If you would like to know whether you can take advantage of laser eye surgery, visit an ophthalmologist who specializes in lasik for a (often) free consult. Read more...
Depends. At age 18, many patients have prescriptions that have not stabilized. If your prescription is stable, you could consider moving forward with laser vision correction. Read more...

Which kind of lasik is appropriate for me? I am nearsighted and worry I may develop a need for reading glasses later in life. I have read that there are two types of lasik eye surgery. Is conventional or wavefront best for me?

You've . You've actually asked two very good questions in one. Presbyopia (loss of near vision) can be treated with lasik most commonly by treating one eye for distance and one eye for near. This type of lasik is called "monovision" and is currently fda approved for myopia. The difference between conventional and wavefront is more about the degree of correction. Conventional treatments treat the common "glasses prescription" of sphere and cylinder. Wavefront treats "higher order aberrations" which are more complex than the typical glasses prescription. In other words, it treats more error in a more sophisticated fashion and achieves better postoperative vision than conventional treatments in almost every study in the medical literature. In my opinion there are only rare circumstances where conventional treatments are preferrable to wavefront. This is a good thing to discuss with your refractive surgeon when you go for your consultation. Best regards, jc. Read more...
Lasik. All patients will need reading glasses after 45-50 years of age unless a monovision ablation is performed. The decision between convention or wavefront ablation depending on your particular measurements. Ask your lasik surgeon. Read more...
Wavefront LASIK. Wavefront lasik and conventional lasik both work very well to help improve vision. You would need to see your own doctor to see which option is best for you. The answer is made more difficult, because the visx laser works best with wavefront, while another popular laser (allegretto) works best with conventional lasik. So - please see your own doctor. Read more...

Could lasek eye surgery help anyone?

No. Lasik eye surgery is to help people who don't want to wear glasses or contacts. The procedure takes your prescription and lasers it onto your cornea. If you don't wear glasses or contacts, lasik won't help you. If you don't mind wearing glasses or contacts, then don't get the procedure done. If you are extremely near-sighted or far-sighted, it may not be for you. Read more...
LASEK. I can make anyone after lasek see sharper than they do now in glasses or contacts as long as they choose our hi-def customvue wavefront option. Read more...

Do you recommend the lasek eye surgery for all?

No. Not everyone is a good candidate for laser eye surgery. Go see a cornea specialist for an evaluation. Read more...
LASEK vs LASIK . There is nobody who can get lasik who can't get lasek. However many people who can't get lasik can get lasek. This is because lasek is the safer less invasive noncutting version of lasik. Only downside is a slightly longer recovery and slightly more discomfort. Trust me i've performed 6, 000 lasiks and 14, 000 laseks. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: lasek eye surgery?

LASEK is like PRK. Lasek is a modified version of prk, where dilute alcohol is used to loosen the epithelium. The epithelium is slid to the side, and an excimer laser is used to reshape the cornea to eliminate myopia, hyperopia, and/or astigmatism. Then - the epithelial layer is repositioned over the cornea, and a bandage contact lens is placed. The epithelium will typical heal over 4 to 5 days. Read more...
LASEK vs. LASIK. Lasek is a laser vision correction where the epithelium ( the e ) is lifted as a sheet and the laser is applied. In contrast in lasik the epithelium and a thin layer of stroma ( the i for in situ ) is lifted then the laser is applied. Read more...

After lasik/lasek eye surgery do you need to avoid using regular lasers?

No. No you can still use laser instrumentation etc. As always, you should use proper eye protection when using a laser whether you have had laser eye surgery or not. Read more...
Laser precautions . No there's no special precautions necessary. Lasek is safer than lasik because there's no flap so if you poke your eye the flap can't come back up or be torn off. Read more...