How do they do nasal polyp removal? Are you out?

Endoscopic surgery. Nasal polyps are usually removed endoscopicly with you asleep. Singular or small ones may be removed in an ENT doctor's office while you are awake.
Usually out. I failed to answer you last question. Obviously, you have to ask your surgeon. I feel that it is much easier to remove massive nasal polyposis under general anesthesia in a hospital setting. Even if the polyps are small, there is always a danger of bleeding if it is performed as an office procedure.
Variety of methods. Each rhinologist uses their own technique. This may vary from the use of forceps, rotatory instruments, rarely laser, and finally snares. The technique is not as important as the surgeon's skill. Usually surgery is reserved for major polyp growth which blocks breathing and smell and has not responded to good medical therapy. Good surgery has risks which you need to know about.

Related Questions

Nasal polyp removal absolutely necessary?

Depends. If you have a nasal polyp on one side - yes it should be removed to make sure it is nothing more serious. Polyps almost always affect both nasal/sinus cavities. If it is seen on only one side - it should be biopsied (or removed). Polyps do not "need to be removed." indications for removal would be 1) if having surgery for chronic sinusitis 2) breathing difficulty 3) trouble smelling. Read more...
Not always. If nasal polyps are small, do not cause significant symptoms and do not invade local structures, like the eye socket and area around the brain then they do not have to be removed. Read more...
Depends. Even though nasal polyposis is almost always a benign inflammation arising from the lateral wall of the nose, the need for surgery depends on your quality of life. If you can not breath and can not smell and steroids orally on and off have not helped, then surgery will be most gratifying. However, the presence of polyps in the absence of symptoms can be treated medically. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: nasal polyp removal?

Polypectomy. Nasal polyps are benign growths that form in response to chronic inflammation. They cause nasal airflow blockage, congestion, etc. And are associated with chronic sinus infection. Polyps are removed through the nose, under endoscopic camera guidance, with fine-tipped steel instruments or tissue shaver, usually along with opening of the sinus passages ("functional endoscopic sinus surgery" (fess). Read more...

Nasal polyp removal absolutely necessary or can one wait (for how long)?

Depends. If the polyps are small and not blocking breathing, medical therapy with oral steroids or topical steroids may be sufficient. Major sinus surgery always is the last thing you should have done. Surgery is performed when medical therapy has failed and your quality of life is very poor. The length of waiting therefore depends on your symptoms. Polyps are almost always a benign disease. Read more...
Sleep apnea too? In addition to what dr. Bernstein joel answered: do you have any signs or symptoms associated with sleep apnea? If so, some cases have been cured or relieved by the removal of nasal polyps. A careful ENT exam can help reveal whether or not it causes obstruction, and whether it should be removed for this reason. Read more...
Depends. If there are no severe symptoms or invasion toward the eye or brain then it can be delayed until any of the above develop. Read more...

Whats invovled with nasal polyp removal surgery?

Endoscopic surgery. This is usally an out-patient surgery done using endoscopes. Many times image guided surgery (gps for the sinuses) is used to prevent complications. Read more...
Endoscopic surgery. Ent doctor looks in your nose with a tv camera while you are asleep and removes them with a tweezer like instrument or a shaver. Surgery takes 30 minutes to two hours depending on severity of the polyps. It is usually outpatient. Read more...

Best hospital or clinic for nasal polyp removal?

Many available. Many otolaryngologist in group or solo practice or affiliated with a hospital have a wealth of experience in nasal polypectomy, endoscopic sinus surgery with or without sinuplasty. Consult with otolaryngologists in your area so you can discuss your treatment. Go with who you are must comfortable with. Good luck! Read more...
Many. There are many sites throughout the country. Your surgeon is more important than the hospital. They should have stereotactic surgery available as this means computer guided surgery. This newer technology makes polyp removal in advanced and more complex cases safer and easier. Read more...
Www.socalsinus.com. I think the surgeon you pick is most important, as they should have extensive experience doing advanced nasal and sinus surgery endoscopically under computer aided image guidance. I routinely perform minimally invasive image guided endoscopic sinus surgery and am known as one of the foremost surgeons in this field on the west coast. Read more...

Septoplasty, nasal turbinate reduction, & nasal polyp removal surgery 6 weeks ago. Nasal irrigation 4x a day but I still have bad headaches day/night.

Cause not treated? If the cause was sinusitis and your surgery did not include sinus surgery, you probably still have sinusitis. There is a possibility also that your headaches have nothing to do with the conditions of your nose. Read more...
See your surgeon. Many possible reasons. Can take 6, 8, or even 10-12 weeks for healing to wind down. However, your headaches may have another cause that needs figuring out. The hypertonic saline, sleep apnea, on going allergies, stress, all possible. But this is not a diagnosis to make on line. I would consult your physician and even a second opinion if you aren't getting relief. Read more...
Still swollen. Your nose and sinuses are still swollen. Be patient, but if things are not slowly improving see your surgeon. Read more...
Improving? Your symptoms should be slowly improving. If not, consult your surgeon for prompt followup. Read more...
Post-op Headaches. Hello. I would recommend seeing your surgeon. Sometimes scar tissue, retained packing or infection can all be to blame. I usually obtain a neurology evaluation before sinus surgery when a patient's main complaint is headache. Often times atypical migranes may be the reason for the headaches. Read more...