Risks of celiac plexus block complications?

Bleeding. The biggest risk is bleeding, block failure, soreness at the site of the block placement. Very rare risks include nerve injury and infection.
Several risks. The most common is pain or soreness at the injection site. Uncommon risks involve bleeding, infection, or unintended injection of local anesthetic into the spinal fluid, epidural space, blood vessels, or other nearby organs. Rarely, a lung may collapse. Fortunately, serious complications are uncommon. Make sure a qualified physician (radiologist, anesthesiologist) does the block.

Related Questions

What are some of the risks of a celiac plexus block?

See below. Infection and bleeding. Failure to relieve pain. Pain at injection site. Injury to nerves, blood vessels, abdominal organs. Read more...

What are the risks of having a celiac plexus block?

See below. Risks include orthostatic hypotension (becoming dizzy and falling upon standing-this wears off when the local anesthetic wears off), diarrhea (also wears off), damage to aorta causing bleeding, paralysis, seizure, spinal or epidural blockade, organ injury and pheumothorax. Read more...

I was wondering what are the risks of a celiac plexus block?

Several. Aside from the standard risks associated with any procedure, including bleeding and infection, a celiac plexus block is associated with rare instances of intestinal perforation and kidney damage. It may also be associated with dangerously low blood pressure. All of the above risks are rare when the procedure is performed by a qualified physician with appropriate equipment. Read more...

Can you explain a celiac plexus block?

Yes. The celiac plexus is a large collection of nerves containing fibers from the abdominal organs. Blockade by local anesthetics will put the nerves to sleep for a period of time. This is done to determine if the pain a patient is experiencing will be relieved by the procedure. The most common indication for the block is pancreatic cancer or chronic pancreatitis. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: celiac plexus block?

Pain control. An injection of local anesthetic or other agent usually to control pain due to the spread of cancer in the organs of the upper abdomen. The celiac plexus is a group of nerve fibers coming from the pancreas, stomach, liver and part of the bowels. Read more...
Nerve Block. A procedure performed under fluoroscopic guidance in which a long-acting local anesthetic is placed at, or near, this nerve relay grouping (celiac plexus) adjacent to the aorta. It may be done to (1) treat chronic cancer or nonmalignant pain, or (2) used to differentiate the different types of pain. Read more...

Could a celiac plexus block help with nausea?

Yes. There are studies that elude to this block as being of efficacy in the control of nausea. However this block is an invasive one with potential dangers and it is primarily reserved for control of intractable abdominal pain. There however less invasive ways to control nausea symptoms without having to resort to celiac plexus block. Read more...

Can a celiac plexus block help relieve nausea?

Yes. The block will help with pain which may indirectly reduce nausea. It will also speed up intestinal motility which also will help. Read more...
Sometimes. A celiac plexus block is usually used for intractable abdominal pain. There have been a couple of studies which have found alleviation of nausea, better control of bowels and better sleep in patients who received a celiac plexus block. Usually physicians turn to this block for pain. Talk to your doctor! for nausea alone there are several medications and patches which may be a better option. Read more...