How often would a dental xray be needed?

At least once a year. I like to do routine dental xrays at least once a year. Every 6 months is even better to assess tooth and periodontal health. The amount of radiation you get from dental xrays is less than you get from being in the sun.
When needed. Im my dental practice we recommend full mouth xrays every three years. However if a dental problem is occuring then xrays are taken to assess or diagnose the problem. Yearly xrays are commonly done by other dentists.Some patients are more prone to having more frequent decay or gum dusease than others requiring more periodic examination, dental cleanings and xrays.
Dental radiographs. Dental radiographs generally are taken every year depending on the dental history of the patient. Some patients can go a year and a half. Many times I am glad we do them every year because if we waited longer the patient might have needed a root canal. Your dentist can help you with this decision.
Depends on Your Hx. Just as every adult should have an ekg as a base-line for future comparisons, a full mouth dental survey or a panoramic radiograph with 4 bite-wing decay-checking x-rays should be taken as a baseline. If there was active decay, the bite wings should be repeated 6 months later. Otherwise, annual bite wings are recommended by me as diet, stress, medications, diseases can change decay patterns.
Do you floss? If your home care is excellent and you haven't had a history if decay or gum issues x-rays do not need to b taken yearly.

Related Questions

Dental xray done twice in one day in a child. Is that ok?

Yes. Dental radiation exposure is negligible. There is an easy to understand comparison table on my website at: www.Drplitt.Com/dental-x-ray-safety/ i hope that helps! Read more...
It is OK. Radiation from dental x-rays is minimal... Even more minimal are the newer digital x-rays. Digital x-rays are up to 90% less radiation exposure than traditional x-rays. Ask your dentist if the type he is using are digital. They are immediate, not the old fashioned little individual ones. Read more...
If digital yes!! Two digital dental radiographs of child's teeth on the same day is absolutely safe. The radiation level is so low that it us almost negligible. I am amazed that parents have little or no concerns if a child's broken arm is x-rayed multiple times, exposing the him/her to possibly a thousand times more radiation, but they are very concerned when their kids get a couple if dental x-rays! Read more...
Dental x-rays. If it were my child, i would have 0% concern. With proper precautions such as lead shield, modern digital equipment, etc. Risks are minimal. We are exposed to radiation on a daily basis and some exposure such as flying in an airplane. One always has to weigh risks vs diagnostic necessity and benefits. Read more...

How safe is it getting a digital dental xray on a machine?

Very safe. Digital x-rays are currently the gold standard for dental imaging. They provide extremely useful diagnostic information to the dentist and reduce the overall exposure to radiation by as much as 90%. Computer software allows the image to be enhanced or magnified and also allows patients to really see what a dentist may want to show them on a computer screen. They can also be emailed to anyone. Read more...
Very safe. Digital radiographs eliminate 90% of the radiation. It is very safe to have digital radiographs taken. Read more...
Extremely. Everything has risks. With proper technique and safeguards there is minimal risk and compared to the benefits of properly diagnosing and treating dental problems, you shouldn't have any second thoughts. You get more radiation from flying in an airplane and more daily background radiation than from a few digital x-rays. Everything has to be put in proper perspective. Read more...
Digital x-ray safety. Very safe.- 75-90% less radiation. Any air flight gives you more radiation.Digital images are loaded into a computer that can enhance lighten/ darken enlarge increase and decrease contrast. They can be emailed put on a cd or thumb drive. Great for the doc and easy to read. Read more...
Much safer. Than film based x-rays because it utilizes only a fraction of the radiation used in film based. Additionally the ability to adjust the image (lighten / darken / contrast) are of tremendous value. The last benefit is that the image can be emailed to a subsequent treating and be of the same image quality - unlike film based where there is always loss of clarity in the copies. Hope this helps. Read more...
Extremely safe. In fact the newest technology is so safe that a leading dental research group recommends the use of a lead apron for patient "physiological" assurance not out of concerns of radiation exposure. And... New fda approved hand held x-ray devices such as the nomad do not require operator shielding. Read more...

Heard about quality of the nomad handheld dental xray machine?

I Use it often. I have had one for three years and i really enjoy it for multiple situations. Because of the lower emitance of radiation i would have to say that the clarity for diagnosing decay is less than more traditional devises but still good. For the semi-compliant child and for endodontics and for portability, the nomad is really great. Read more...
Not much. The handheld unit produces radiation to expose dental radiographs. My understanding is that you can use it for either digital exposures or film exposures. As long as proper radiation safety protocols are followed for the patient and the operator, no problems should be expected. I can only note that the quality of the radiograph exposed depends on following recommended settings for exposures. Read more...
Excellent 3 years!! I believe the the nomad was the first handheld fda approved "x-ray" device. I have used it for 3 years. It is convenient , potable, cost effective (one unit can be enough for an entire office) takes excellent pictures and incredibly safe (low radiation digital) to the patient and health care provider! Read more...

How come safety important when operating a dental xray equipment?

X-ray safety. No one, patient, doctor. Or staff should be exposed to unnecessarily ionizing radiation. There is a risk of it causing cancer. See: http://www.Cancer.Org/treatment/understandingyourdiagnosis/examsandtestdescriptions/imagingradiologytests/imaging-radiology-tests-rad-risk. Read more...
Safety first ! You should be safe and cautions when doing anything... Driving, cooking, playing sports, etc. Radiographic equipment produce radiation. The small amount that the patient is subject to is necessary for diagnostic purposes. The operator, if exposed, is exposed needlessly and gains no value from the experience. Safer to minimize unnecessary exposure. Read more...
Radiation issues! Dental radiographs especially modern digital check up films are very safe, especially for a patient. And extremely safe when compared to a hospital chest x-ray etc. However, radiation builds with time and the people most susceptible to poor radiograph safety issues are those who take the films. Fortunately, with digital film exposure time a fraction of a few years ago there is now less concern. Read more...

Can you tell me what occurs if you forget to take out a piercing for a dental xray?

Distorted image. Some types of dental x-ray machines like a panorex takes a large film of the lower half of the face, teeth and jaws. This film will swing around the head exposing one side than the other. A metal object like a piercing, even an earring, can cause a shadow or distortion on film that can mask or hide important details. You can be misdiagnosed because of it. Read more...

I'm interested to know what happens if you forget to take out a piercing for a dental xray?

It will show up. Depending on the position of the jewelry and the x-ray it will show up on the x-ray as a solid white object and may possibly obscure what the dentist needs to see. If that happens the image will need to be re-taken without the jewelry in place. Read more...