How do I know if I have colon cancer? Family history.

Get a colonoscopy. The most accurate diagnostic tool available to answer your question is a colonoscope. If you are at risk, have alarm signs or symptoms, or have reached an age appropriate for screening then call your gastroenterologist & book your exam. You can also identify colon cancer with a specific stool test. X-rays will identify mass lesions, but may miss flat lesions, & do not permit taking of a biopsy.

Related Questions

Is it likely that I have colon cancer if there is a family history of it?

No. You are at somewhat higher risk if there is a family history especially in first degree relatives. The odds are still against you having or developing colon cancer. Having said that, you should be vigilant and get regular colonoscopies. If a first degree relative had colon cancer, your initial colonoscopy should be about 10 to 15 years prior to the age at which that person was diagnosed. Read more...

I'm 22 what are the odds I have colon cancer with no family history or heridatry chances of getting it. Ithink about having it everyday it bothers me?

Lighting strike. You are also at risk of being struck by lightening. Does that bother you? If there is no family history of early colon cancer, you are not at risk of colon cancer at your age. When you turn 50, get a screening colonoscopy. For good health - Have a diet rich in fresh vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low fat milk and milk products, nuts, beans, legumes, lentils and small amounts of lean meats. Avoid saturated fats. Exercise at least 150 minutes/week and increase the intensity of exercise gradually. Do not use tobacco, alcohol, weed or street drugs in any form. Practice safe sex. Read more...

I have a family history of colon cancer. What should I look out for?

Stool change. At age 40 the possibility of hereditary polyposis leading to colon cancer is rare if you don't have any disease as of now. Most colon malignancies are environmentally induced probably arising from the polyoma virus infecting the bowel mucosa. The other cause is related to long standing inflammatory bowel disease. You should have an initial colonoscopy to evaluate your bowel. Read more...

How much does a family history of colon cancer increase my risk of getting it?

About 10% A family history of colon cancer, especially in a close relative, increases the risk of cancer 10% above the general population. If the relative was diagnosed at a younger age (40's) then the risk is slightly higher. Read more...
Double the risk. If there is personal family history then the risk of getting colon cancer is usually double than that of the general population. If your family member was young when he/she developed colon cancer then you should have your screening colonoscopy done 5-10 years before the age that your family member developed cancer. Read more...
Varies. The "family history" of colon cancer needs to be further clarified as to what type of family syndrome this is. A genetic counselor can help further define the risks and potential surveillance or treatment strategies. The increased risk may be small or may be very large. Specific genetic testing may be indicated. Read more...

How likely is it that someone 22 years old with no immediate family history of colon cancer gets it?

Over what time span? About 5% of men in the US will get colon cancer at some point in their life, but the vast majority of cases occur after age 50. Colon cancer is extremely rare, almost unheard of in a 22 yo, but the odds increase the older we get. However, there are many ways to prevent colon cancer such as avoiding red meat, eating more fruit & vegies, vit. D, not smoking & exercise. See http://tinyurl.com/ozhk7zu. Read more...

Is colon cancer common for 36 year old male with no family history?

No. Colon cancer is at your age of 36 is 0.25%(2.5 chances in 1000)over the next 10 years ,9.2 chances in 1000 over next 20 yrs. So the answer is it is very RARE for your age.If you are having colon symptoms see your doctor.Good luck. Read more...
Not common. The disease, a complication associated with inflammatory bowel disease is more frequent as a field effect which has developed in the bowel secondary to viral entry such as the polyoma virus. The normal cells begin to genetically transform and eventually result in carcinoma most prevalent in the 50's and 60's years of age. A select, small polypoid group can also transform to Ca. Read more...

How rare is colon cancer for a white male under 40 (36) and no family history?

5% From 2005-2009, the median age at diagnosis for cancer of the colon and rectum was 69 years of age . Approximately 0.1% were diagnosed under age 20; 1.1% between 20 and 34; 4.0% between 35 and 44; 13.4% between 45 and 54. You should see a genetician to see if there is familial cancer syndrome like hnpcc. Read more...