How common is hepatitis?

Depends. Depends on which population you are looking at. Worldwide there are 300 million with hep b and the incidence of hep c is about 0.3/1000. The prevalence is greatly increased in high risk groups such as high risk sexual behavior and IV drug abuse. Prevention is your best friend as hep b and c can both cause chronic and life altering infection.

Related Questions

How common is hepatitis a in the united states?

Rare. Hepatitis A became a rare infection in the US especially among children since the institution of universal vaccination against it. Read more...
Hard to be certain. There are about 25,000 new cases of hep. A reported each year. However the number is thought to be much higher because many cases are asymptomatic or mild and are never reported. The number of cases has dropped significantly because of the effectiveness of Hep.A vaccine. . Read more...

How common is hepatitis D?

Hepatitis D. Hepatitis D virus requires hepatitis B virus to be replicated. According to the World Health Organization: "Approximately 15 million people across the world are chronically coinfected with HDV and HBV ." See: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/hepatitis-d/en/ Read more...

How common is hepatitis C in united states?

Hep C prevalence. Epidemiologic data (nhanes iii study) suggests about 3%. But there are flaws with the methodology and the acutal % may be higher. Currently the CDC are contemplating changing screening recommendations to all people born between 1946 and 1964, possilby to 1970. http://www.hhs.gov/ash/initiatives/hepatitis/actionplan_viralhepatitis2011.pdf. Read more...
Varies. Estimates are from 2.7 to 4.5 millions, but most patients are in the baby group born between 1946 and 1964. If you are in that group or older, you should get tested. Read more...

How common is hepatitis after a blood transfusion in the us now?

Less than before. This is probably a lot less common than before due to vaccination for hepatitis b, and more diligent screening. The transmission of hepatitis c via transfusion is currently at a rate of about 1 in 2 million units. Hepatitis b is probably less than that. Read more...