What is ptsd?

Posttraumatic Stress. Posttraumatic stress disorder is an anxiety disorder that develops after someone experiences a traumatic incident, where they feared for life or limb. Symptoms develop in three realms: reexperiencing (nightmares, flashbacks), hypervigilence (increased startle response, continually looking for threats), and avoidance (of anything that might trigger memories of trauma).
Traumatic Stress. PTSD, can occur after someone goes through or witnesses a traumatic life event like: combat, child or adult sexual or physical abuse/assault, terrorism, robbery, serious accident, or natural disaster. Most people have some stress-related reactions after a traumatic event: fear, sadness, guilt, anger, sleep problems, and disturbing memories. PTSD may be diagnosed if these persist after 30 days.
PTSD. Ptsd is a disorder of mind, body & spirit. It can ravage the soul and destroy families. After experiencing trauma which is overwhelming to the person sxs of avoidance, hyper-arousal, reliving develop. Although complex ptsd is the gift that keeps on giving, it is treatable. Early treatment is best.
Anxiety disorder. Ptsd usually is the result of witnessing or in someway experiencing something that could harm somebody. Symptoms usually fall in 3 domains - re-experiencing (e.G nightmares), hyperarousal (e.g. Jumpiness) and avoidance. However, ptsd symptoms have enough similarities with those of other conditions that an evaluation by a psychologist/psychiatrist is essential to make the diagnosis. Hope this helps.
An anxiety disorder. A serious often debilitating anxiety disorder resulting from witnessing or experiencing a highly terrifying and horrifying life threatening event. It is treatable (medications and therapy) early intervention is important. Read about it at nimh.Org.
Threat of death. PTSD is a post trauma reaction to being in the situation of impending real or perceived loss of life, or inability to is scape. Examples of this would come from being in combat situations, or severe physical or sexual abuse. There are degrees of PTSD, it is not a matter of either the patient does or does not have it, it's not all or none.

Related Questions

I was curious what a ptsd support group is like at a vet center?

Group Tx at VET CTR. It can be very helpful. Whether you go to a support group at a va medical center or you go to one of the vet centers- there will be men and women there who have like combat experiences. It is support from people who can actually relate, who have a basis to understand you. They are dealing with many of the same issues: sleep, guilt, anger, emotional numbing, avoidance & feeling unsafe. Get help. Read more...
Can be effective. PTSD support groups at vet centers often can be very effective. Combat veterans talking with other combat veterans for many sufferers of combat PTSD is the best way to go, in addition to medication and individual therapy. Read more...
Can vary. PTSD support groups can be very beneficial in that they provide a safe environment for learning about one's condition, sharing with individuals who have gone through similar experiences, and hearing about how others cope with day to day challenges. Individuals are encouraged to share their experiences, and to provide support to others, within their range of comfort. Read more...

What is complex ptsd?

Complex PTSD. Complex PTSD is a proposed diagnosis to be added to the medical diagnostic system to cover individuals who have had chronic trauma and whose resulting symptoms are different or in addition to typical PTSD. For example chronic trauma may cause more damage to self-concept, and it may predispose people to more complex and challenging issues with anxiety etc. Good question! Read more...
Complex PTSD is. a term offered to identify individuals with PTSD who have experienced prolonged and severs trauma which can impact a person's self-concept and the ways they adapt to stress. Dr. Herman at Harvard suggests this distinction and likelihood of special treatment considerations. Best regards. Read more...

What symptoms of ptsd do people have in real life here?

A wide variety. People keep "re-experiencing" the traumatic event in a variety of ways (e.g., memories dreams), they find themselves avoiding reminders of the trauma, and just feeling "numb" or detached in various ways. In addition, they also have difficulties feeling calm and on an even keel (e.g., it can be hard to sleep or concentrate). Therapy and/or medications tailored to the individual's symptoms can help. Read more...
It depends. People can witness or experience life-threatening events, or be otherwise victimized, in "real life." automobile accidents; being criminally or domestically assaulted; and physical/sexual/emotional abuse in childhood is more common than appreciated. All can have sequelae. Some symptoms can be nightmares, strong "startle" response, re-experiencing of trauma; avoidance or numbing of emotion, etc. Read more...
PTSD. Hyperarousal, avoidance, hypervigilance. Most common are loss of interest or pleasure, nightmares, flashbacks, despair/hopelessness, anger/irritability, and somatic complaints such as headaches. Read more...
Symptom inquiry. The doctor should inquire if the patient has been in a situation where the patient believes loss of life or catastrophic injury was imminent, and with no means of escape. Symptoms from these experiences include, hypervigilance, sleep loss, nightmares, reliving the trauma, social withdrawal, anhedonia, temper outbursts, emotional withdrawal, feelings of unfinished business, and adrenalin seeking. Read more...

What purpose does ptsd serve the human body?

It's a disorder. Ptsd serves no useful purpose, per se. It is a troubling anxiety disorder that occurs like an echo of a horrible sound we wish we never heard. It is a disorder and is not beneficial to the human body. That's why we, who treat patients with it, are helping people move beyond it and return to a peaceful, satisfying life. Read more...
Adaptive to danger. The same sxs that are found in ptsd can be adaptive in combat. Waking at a moment's notice can save your life. Battle breathing- rapid breathing & heart rate occur when engaged in battle. Hypervigilance makes you aware of danger. Emotional numbing allows you to respond to the immediate. Compartmentalization allows one to engage in war. The problem is when the sxs don't dissipate when it is safe. Read more...
Ptsd. Triggering your brain alarm system to react to protect from perceived harm. Read more...
Ptsd. Triggering your brain alarm system to react to protect from perceived harm. Read more...

Please advise how to show what posttraumatic stress disorder (ptsd) feels like?

IT DEPENDS. Your question suggests that somebody does not believe you. I would start by telling such a person what ptsd is and what might cause it. You do not need to be specific about what your traumatic event was. I would then tell the person to suggest to me what he/she imagines it would feel if s/he had been traumatized. People experience ptsd very differently but no matter how it does it hurts. Read more...
Might not be able to. You may not be able to. I don't encourage combat ptsd patients to try to explain war or all of their sxs to spouses. Why? Because the spouses usually don't have the experiences to base an understanding for it. Inevitably the person with ptsd feels misunderstood or badly about the upset it has caused the other . This is why it is so important to work with a therapist who is experienced with ptsd. Read more...
PTSD. Ptsd can follow any traumatic event, depending on relevance of event to the person. Anxiety with intrusive recollections & avoidance become evident. Read more...
"Show" or "know"? Most ptsd sufferers alternate between hypervigilance and fear from re-experiencing trauma (including nightmares), or numbing and avoidance of situations that resemble the traumatizing experiences or could be triggers for this. Either is painful. Sometimes it helps to write or draw, or to move the body vigorously. Meet regularly with a group of others who do know what it feels like. Therapy works. Read more...
Symptom inquiry. The doctor should inquire if the patient has been in a situation where the patient believes loss of life or catastrophic injury was imminent, and with no means of escape. Symptoms from these experiences include, hypervigilance, sleep loss, nightmares, reliving the trauma, social withdrawal, anhedonia, temper outbursts, emotional withdrawal, feelings of unfinished business, and adrenalin seeking. Read more...

What are symptoms of PTSD? My son had a very close call with his open heart surgery and almost died. One year later I still have horrible flashbacks.

Could be PTSD. These flashbacks could be part of PTSD. More important than naming the exact diagnosis would be getting treatment. There are various forms of psychotherapy ,sometimes with medication, that can be very helpful. Treatment works. Read more...

What medications are used for ptsd?

SSRIs, anxiolytics. While many kinds of medications have been tried, the most commonly used ones are ssri antidepressants, which have the advantage of treating both anxiety and depression, and are non-addictive. Anxiolytics (anti-anxiety meds) such as Buspirone and the benzodiazepine tranquilizers can help too. Beta-blockers are sometimes used to block bodily stress reactions (pounding heart, etc). Read more...
Another medicine. Another medicine is Minipress (prazosin) which can be used for ptsd nightmares. It works by crossing the blood brain barrier & blocking norepinephrine ( a chemical like adrenalin) acting in the brain. Prazosin was first used for ptsd in 1995. Trauma nightmares are true-life situations, extremely realistic, and they are accompanied by an adrenaline storm which does not happen with bad dreams. Read more...
Various. The mainstay is selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Atypical antipsychotics may be required for severe dissociative states. Prazosin is proving effective for insomnia with nightmares. The combination of melatonin & Buspar (buspirone) can also be effective for sleep. Anxiolytics should be approached cautiously. Read more...

What's the diagnosis method for ptsd?

Professionally. If you meet with a psychologist or psychiatrist who knows about trauma then he or she can diagnose you. Be well, . Read more...
Post Traumatic . Stress disorder (ptsd) occurs in the context of a person witnessing or experiencing a horrific or life threatening event(s). There are 3 categories of symptoms. The 1st is avoidance - avoiding people, places, things, sounds or smells that trigger memories or feelings related to the event. The 2nd is reliving- this can take place through dreams, thoughts, memories, flashbacks or other forms of >>. Read more...

Child with ptsd- what should they avoid?

Interesting question. Your question is ironic in that avoidance is a symptom of ptsd. So, if your child has ptsd he/she is already avoiding reminders or cues of the traumatic events and perhaps a number of social events and situations. Since avoidance is a symptom of ptsd, additional avoidance is not a primary goal. Professional treatment can help. Gradual exposure to feared situations in small doses eventually helps. Read more...
Seek treatment. If your child truly has ptsd (was he evaluated by a metal health professional?), he can benefit from therapy based on learning principles that help "extinguish" the fear responses while also reshaping the thoughts about the trauma. Interesting that the treatment is based on gradual exposure to trauma related stimuli rather than avoidance. The tx is very effective. Don't delay. Good luck! Read more...
Avoidance. I agree with dr. Smith. I would initially avoid exposing the child to triggers that overwhelm him or her. As the child stabilizes during therapy, gently reintroducing people, places, things that served as triggers may be possible. Decisions can be made with family, child & therapist if there are areas that merit continued avoidance. Timing is very important to avoid significant regression. Read more...