9 doctors weighed in:
If I smoked, should I get tested for lung cancer?
9 doctors weighed in

Dr. David Cooke
Surgery - Thoracic
5 doctors agree
In brief: Screening
The national lung screening trial demonstrated survival advantage in patients who underwent low dose ct scan screening and were high risk.
High risk is defined as heavy or former smokers (quit within 15 years) and aged 55-74.

In brief: Screening
The national lung screening trial demonstrated survival advantage in patients who underwent low dose ct scan screening and were high risk.
High risk is defined as heavy or former smokers (quit within 15 years) and aged 55-74.
Dr. David Cooke
Dr. David Cooke
Thank
Dr. Loki Skylizard
Surgery - Thoracic
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Health maintain
Collaborative health maintenance is critical to your health.
If you smoke, you should stop. There are guidelines and recommendations as to who should undergo testing/screening. This may help: http://www.Cancer.Net/publications-and-resources/what-know-ascos-guidelines/what-know-accp-and-asco-guideline-lung-cancer-screening/recommendations-lung-cancer-screening.

In brief: Health maintain
Collaborative health maintenance is critical to your health.
If you smoke, you should stop. There are guidelines and recommendations as to who should undergo testing/screening. This may help: http://www.Cancer.Net/publications-and-resources/what-know-ascos-guidelines/what-know-accp-and-asco-guideline-lung-cancer-screening/recommendations-lung-cancer-screening.
Dr. Loki Skylizard
Dr. Loki Skylizard
Thank
Dr. Joseph Woods
Pathology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Yes.
If you smoked, you should definitely get follow-up to be sure you don't have lung cancer.
This is really important if you still smoke now. If you quit, your risk of lung cancer goes down with time, to the point of being similar to non-smoker risk. But you should get follow up with imaging studies of the lung, and other lung tests.

In brief: Yes.
If you smoked, you should definitely get follow-up to be sure you don't have lung cancer.
This is really important if you still smoke now. If you quit, your risk of lung cancer goes down with time, to the point of being similar to non-smoker risk. But you should get follow up with imaging studies of the lung, and other lung tests.
Dr. Joseph Woods
Dr. Joseph Woods
Thank
Read more answers from doctors