Are varicose veins dangerous?

They can be. Varicose veins may be of cosmetic concern, but commonly cause symptoms such as leg heaviness, leg fatigue, itching, night cramps, and restless legs. They can also lead to leg swelling, eczema, skin inflammation, and leg ulceration. Phlebitis can occur in a varicose vein, which could lead to a blood clot. Consult a phlebologist (http://www.Phlebology.Org/) to discuss your particular condition.
Varicose Veins. For most individuals, varicose veins are typically not considered dangerous. But for those with severe disease that is left untreated for many years, it can lead to some significant medical problems such as chronic leg swelling / edema, leg pain, or even venous stasis ulcers. Sometimes you can also have significant bleeding from ruptured veins when the skin breaks down over the veins. Phlebitis or clots are another possible complication.
Not usually. Varicose veins may be asymptomatic or symptomatic. While varicose veins/venous insufficiency can sometimes result in superficial thrombophlebitis (blood clots), ulceration, bleeding...These conditions are not generally dangerous per se and can be treated quite effectively by a vein specialist/phlebologist.
Could be. Varicose veins are for the most part not dangerous but they do have a problematic potential. Varicose veins are due to malfunctioning valves in the saphenous system and usually cause symptoms of aching, heaviness, tired, cramping or leg swelling. These same veins can worsen and cause clots, bleeding and venous stasis ultimately leading to venous ulcers it is wise to see a vein specialist early.
Can be. If you have longstanding, untreated varicose veins and complications that we call chronic venous insufficiency, you can develop a venous leg ulcer from that. Although not usually even potentially dangerous, unless they become infected (which is rare), they can be very difficult to deal with. Phlebitis is more common in varicose veins and it is possible to get a deep vein thrombus from that.

Related Questions

I have varicose veins on the side of my left leg near my knee, they hurt sometimes and they are gradually but slightly growing. Is this dangerous?

Vari/veins/tx. If you are having any symptoms best for seek in person evaluation and possible treatment.. Read more...
Usually worsens. With varicose veins developing at such a young age I would definitely recommend that you get evaluation by a vascular surgeon for possible treatment as the situation is only going to get worse with time. The varicose veins will tend to get bigger, more numerous, & more painful with time. The longer you have them the more difficult it will be to fix them. You likely have venous insufficiency. Read more...
A little bit. Varicose Veins do increase your risk for blood clots and sores {ulcers} on your legs. Over time varicose veins will tend to get bigger, more numerous, & more painful. The longer you have them the more difficult it will be to fix them. You likely have venous insufficiency. It is best to get this checked by a vein specialist also called phlebologist. Read more...
Varicose veins. the veins that you are seeing other result of venous reflux from further appear leg. The pooling in the area is causing her discomfort. I would recommend a venous Doppler-sonogram be performed to determine the source of reflux, and then after appropriate mapping, a thermal ablation procedure would be recommended to treat the problem. In the interim I would recommend use of a compression stockin. Read more...

I had my varicose veins stripped in November. I am now experiencing a swollen bruise on the leg. Could this be dangerous?

Sounds like. a common post surgical issue. See your surgeon ( I assume he/she is a vascular surgeon) and check it ou. For NOW apply heat gently and a daily Aspirin may help. Dr Z. Read more...

What are varicose veins?

Enlarged veins. Varicose veins are swollen, twisted, and sometimes painful veins that have filled with an abnormal collection of blood. Read more...
Bulging veins. Varicose veins are enlarged usually twisting blue veins larger than 3 mm in diameter. Veins return blood to the heart. One-way valves are present in most veins to keep blood from flowing back down the vein. In varicose veins, these valves don't work well (either because the vein walls have stretched or because the valves are dysfunctional)- resulting in blood pooling in the veins. Read more...
Bulging veins. Varicose veins are bulging veins that are formed when veins are exposed to increased pressure. The increased pressure in the vein is usually due to leaky vein valves that allow the blood to pool and pressurize veins. Varicose veins may be entirely asymptomatic or cause pain, swelling, tiredness, or heaviness of the legs. Read more...
Vein with weak walls. Dr. Nielsen has given a very nice answer. The other part of the problem is that varicose veins also have weak walls. This allows the high pressure in the veins to stretch the veins, make them bigger and longer, and that causes the large, bulging, squiggley appearance of the veins. Read more...
Big Weak Leaky Veins. Varicose veins are enlarged often several times larger than normal veins because their walls are weak which causes them to dilate. They are incompetent because the valves inside of them leak so they dont circulate the blood effectively. They usually occur on the legs. Read more...
Varicose Veins. Varicose veins are disease veins have become large, bulging, with serpentine-like shape. They are often painful and unsightly & usually form on the legs. They occur due to a disease process witin the veins in which the valves that direct blood flow become damaged thus allowing stagnation of blood flow & pressure build-up inside them. The valve damage is usually progressive & it worsens w/ time. Read more...
Bulging Veins. Varicose veins are bulging grape-like appearing veins which are most commonly seen on the legs. These are due to leaking(refluxing) valves usually in the saphenous system. Some causes include hereditary, pregnancy, trauma and aging. The gold standard of treatment is to have a venous reflux ultrasound to both diagnose and form a treatment plan. You should see a vein specialist. Read more...
Varicose veins. Veins that bulge under the skin secondary to abnormal flow and valves that are damaged. Commonly they can cause pain, swelling, bulging, aching, phlebitis or even skin changes or open sores. There are many minimally invasive options nowadays for treatment based on the size and symptoms you have. For this you can see a vein specialist about medical compression therapy and options for your specifics. Read more...

What causes varicose veins?

Genes and behavior. There are many factors that contribute to varicose veins. Some of these are genetics, standing for lengthy periods, gravity or hormones. Today's technology allows surgeons to perform treatment for varicose veins using minimally invasive techniques. This allows for faster healing and return to work in just a few days. Read more...
Genetics, pregnancy. The most common causes of varicose veins include genetics or family history, pregnancy, trauma, hormonal influences, and occupations or activities with prolonged standing or sitting. All of these lead to valvular incompetence in the veins, which allows reflux of blood and venous pooling in the limb, with increasing venous pressure and eventual dilation of the superficial veins into varicosities. Read more...
Heredity. Far and away the most common cause of varicose veins is heredity. If both of your parents have varicose veins, you have a 95% chance of getting them yourself. Other factors that come into play are standing for long periods of time at work, age, horrmones, and probably pregnancy. Studies are mixed on the effects of pregnancy. Interestingly obesity has never been shown to have any effect. Read more...
Vein valve problems. I agree that the risk factors for development of varicose veins as above. In heredity cases, patients are born with incompetent one way valves with prevent the venous blood from flowing backward down the extremities. Increased abdominal pressure with pregnancy can cause the superficial veins to be under extreme pressure due to the lack of vavular function. Consider compression stockings. Read more...
Leaking valves. Varicose veins are a very common problem and they are due to leaking valves (called reflux) usually in the saphenous veins. Think of your veins like a tree with the trunk being the saphenous vein and the branches being the varicose veins. A venous reflux ultrasound will make the diagnosis. Common causes of this are hereditary, aging and pregnancies in women. They are treatable with a laser. Read more...
Bad valves. Varicose veins are caused by valve problems that allow blood from deep high-pressure veins to enter low-pressure veins just under the skin. These veins enlarge, (varicose), leak fluid through the walls (swelling), letting blood through (discoloration) and finally nutritious arterial blood cannot enter an area of the skin resulting in ulcers. It is treated by laser ablation. Read more...
Genetics. The most common reason that people get varicose veins is genetic predisposition for weakened valves in their leg saphenous veins. Other reasons can include trauma or phlebitis which damages vein valves in the legs. Although genetic predisposition is the most important factor, other situations can increase the severity or speed up the process of veins showing, such as pregnancy or being overweight. Read more...
Multiple causes. There are many causes for this that include family history, multiple pregnancies, obesity and trauma. There are many safe and effective medical and surgical treatments for this condition. Read more...
Bad valves. When the valves in our leg do not work the blood pools there and the increased pressure causes varicose veins. Some times old DVT can cause valve damage but often it is just wear and tear. More common as we age. Veins can be treated with stockings or in appropriate patients with ablation of the diseased veins, an outpatient procedure. Vein surgery can be overused. See someone you trust. Read more...
Varicose Vein Cause. Some potential causes are heredity, age, standing for long periods, trauma, pregnancy, and obesity. We have valves in our veins that help push blood back up toward the heart. Over time, these valves get weak. Blood flow becomes inefficient and ends up pooling in the legs/your saphenous veins. This leads to varicose veins that may need treatment, especially if you have symptoms. Read more...

Are varicose veins painful?

Sometimes. In addition to their unsightly cosmetic appearance, varicose veins can be painful, though not all patients report pain. Some patients experience heaviness, tiredness, aching, or cramping especially after standing or exercising for long periods of time, while others complain of burning or tingling sensation, occasional swelling or throbbing, and tenderness around the veins. Read more...
Possibly. Other symptoms can include restless leg syndrome, skin changes in the lower leg to include darkened pigmentation, eczema and even ulcers. If you are having pain consult a board certified phlebologist, interventional radiologist or a vascular surgeon. Read more...
Yes, often. Besides pain, varicose veins can cause aching, throbbing, restlessness, cramping, itching, burning, heaviness, tiredness, fatigue, and ankle swelling. Generally, the longer you are on your feet, the worse the symptoms become. If inflamed, the pain becomes worse and you can even get warmth, swelling and redness of the vein. Chronic inflammation can cause skin discoloration and even ulceration. Read more...
It depends. Pain is subjective some people have large varicose veins yet have no symptoms, others with smaller size veins may. There are various symptoms swelling heaviness tired legs, itchy sensation. Read more...
Frequently Yes. In addition to " pain " the following symptoms commonly occur with varicose veins: leg aching, burning, itching, throbbing, heaviness, fatigue, tiredness, cramping, swelling in legs and leg restlessness or "restless legs syndrome". If you are having pain or other discomfort you should see a vein specialist and consider treatment. Read more...
Often they are. Because varicose veins are associated with abnormally elevated venous pressure in the leg veins, they are often associated with pain. Other reasons they can be painful is that they can be associated with inlfammatory phlebitis, blood clots (thrombophlebitis), skin damage, or venous ulcers. Pain or discomfort is one of the most common reasons that patients with varicose veins present to a doctor. Read more...
Yes they can be. Varicose veins can cause multiple symptoms including being painful. Your legs can also swell and itch. They can cause discoloration. The underlying cause is venous insufficiency or reflux. Read more...
Sometimes. Most people with varicose veins don't have any symptoms , with larger varicose veins people can experience pain and ache . http://patient.info/health/varicose-veins-leaflet. Read more...

What causes varicose veins?

Leaking valves. Varicose veins are a very common problem and they are due to leaking valves (called reflux) usually in the saphenous veins. Think of your veins like a tree with the trunk being the saphenous vein and the branches being the varicose veins. A venous reflux ultrasound will make the diagnosis. Common causes of this are hereditary, aging and pregnancies in women. They are treatable with a laser. Read more...
Bad valves. Varicose veins are caused by valve problems that allow blood from deep high-pressure veins to enter low-pressure veins just under the skin. These veins enlarge, (varicose), leak fluid through the walls (swelling), letting blood through (discoloration) and finally nutritious arterial blood cannot enter an area of the skin resulting in ulcers. It is treated by laser ablation. Read more...
Multiple causes. There are many causes for this that include family history, multiple pregnancies, obesity and trauma. There are many safe and effective medical and surgical treatments for this condition. Read more...
Varicose veins Cause. Usually varicose vein disease is genetically acquired. Weak vein valves progressively break as a result of venous insufficiency. Leg ultrasound often reveals venous reflux disease in veins called saphenous veins, which causes the development of the surface veins. Other factors such as female gender, hormones, being overweight, pregnancies, trauma, or clots can precipitate or worsen the disease. Read more...
Varicose veins. Most people have varicose veins without any underlying disease .Pregnancy, over weight, standing for too long and increasing age increase chance of having varicose veins. Sometimes having a previous blood clot or injury to underlying vein or tumour in lower abdomen or abnormal blood vessel can be responsible for varicose vein formation. Read more...

How to fight varicose veins?

Surgery. No medications help. But not all varicoceles need surgery. If you have no pain and no impairment in fertility, you likely don't need therapy. Read more...
Unfortunately no way. Varicose veins develop as a result of faulty valves within the veins (mostly) on your legs; it might be associated with a genetic predisposition, but it is also associated with jobs that require a lot of standing or sitting. You can help the symptoms by using compression stockings, but you should seek the advice of a vascular surgeon in dealing with these veins. Read more...
Lifelong care. As dr. Hernandez says, spider veins, varicose veins and venous disease is inherited and made worse with hormones, pregnancies, prolonged sitting and standing, heavy weight lifting, and others... Phlebology is a specialty for treating veins: www.Phlebolgy.Org minimally invasive diagnostic and treatments to get rid of each type of problem before it progresses and exercise and medical compression. Read more...
Varicose veins. That depends on how severe the veins are & what type of symptoms or complications you are having. Mild cases can be treated with compression stockings. More severe cases may require interventional treatments such as endovenous ablation, sclerotherapy, or phlebecotomy surgery. I recommend that you see a vascular surgeon who specializes in vein treatments to make the appropriate recommendations. Read more...
See a vein doctor. Varicose veins are usually due to malfunctioning valves is the saphenous veins. This can be diagnosed by a venous reflux ultrasound. You should see a vascular surgeon or a vein specialist. The gold standard for varicose vein treatment is to seal the leaking valves with a laser or radio frequency catheter. Read more...

Varicose veins. What can I do?

See vascular surgeon. Go see a vascular surgeon to be evaluated. There are many treatment options available and most don't entail surgery. Make sure to find a board certified vascular surgeon (check www.Certificationmatters.Org) and be very careful to avoid vein clinics that don't have them on staff. Read more...
Consultation. Evaluation by a vein specialist to include history, physical exam, and duplex ultrasound evaluation. Read more...
See a specialist. As dr. Hertzman said, you should have an evaluation from a vein specialist. In the mean time though, there are simple things you can do which will help temporarily. These include using properly fitting compression stockings with adequate compression. Elevating your legs when you can gives relief, as does taking anti-inflammatory medicine. Regular exercise and no prolonged standing also helps. Read more...
See Vascular Surgeon. See a vascular surgeon to discuss your treatment options. Usually varicose vein disease is genetically acquired. Weak vein valves progressively break as a result of venous insufficiency. Leg ultrasound often reveals venous reflux disease in veins called saphenous veins, which causes the development of the surface veins. Compression stockings can help slow the spread & help symptoms temporarily. Read more...