Why should I be concerned about ovarian cancer after cesarean hysterectomy?

Not really. If you had that , which is uncommon, they most likely left your ovaries in. At the time of the hysterectomy they should have seen both ovaries and if anything was abnormal with either of them, they would have removed them. Your risk , assuming you have no other risk factors ( like a family history ) should be the same as anyone else.

Related Questions

I had a hysterectomy last year aged 29. Gyn left a cyst on ovary said it shall disappear. I have all symptoms for ovarian cancer should I be concerned?

Ultrasound. If you are concerned about the presence of the cyst the Gynecologist saw at the hysterectomy, you can get an ultrasound done to check for the presence or absence of the cyst. Do you have family history of ovarian cancer? You are too young to get your ovaries removed. Surgical menopause at this young age is not recommended. Symptoms of ovarian cancer are vague and can be from colon or stomach too. Read more...

Can you get ovarian cancer after a hysterectomy?

Yes. "hysterectomy " technically means removal of the uterus, not the ovaries and the uterus. A bso (bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy) means removal of both ovaries and fallopian tubes. Even if the ovaries have been removed, there is a very small chance that ovarian cancer can develop from cells that line the abdominal cavity. This chance is much less than 1 in 100. Read more...
Yes. A hysterectomy and even tubal ligation appear to reduce the risk of ovarian cancer significantly. It does not eliminate the risk. Even when taking out the ovaries during hysterectomy, a remnant may remain behind and grow into ovarian cancer. Also the lining of the inside of the abdomen called peritoneum may grow to a similar disease to ovarian cancer. Read more...

At 27, I had ovarian cancer and then a hysterectomy. Is HRT safe for me? My cancer was malignant dysgermanoma.

Should be. Based on your cancer history, HRT should be safe but there can be other contraindications so you should discuss it with your doctor. Read more...
Yes. Before your ovaries were removed, they made hormones (hrt) so you should be fine using replacement after the surgery. That particular type of cancer should not be affected by replacement. A person with breast cancer, active blood clots, certain types of uterine cancer or undiagnosed vaginal bleeding should not use hrt. Read more...

I have a brown foul discharge and I've had a partial hysterectomy. Could it be ovarian cancer?

Be checked. A discharge from the vagina means you need to have swabs done. If you still have your ovaries they can be imaged with an ultrasound. Your symptoms don't fit cancer. All the best. Read more...

Had hysterectomy in 2001, all gone but one ovary. It quit producing estrogen 2 years ago, can I still get ovarian cancer?

Yes. A yearly check of the ovary at your gynecologist is your best prevention. Ovarian cancer is fairly common and this is worth doing. Read more...
Yes, you can. Any ovary can develop ovarian cancer, even if it has stopped producing estrogen. In fact, the risk for ovarian cancer increases with age. The median age at diagnosis is 63. The good news is that ovarian cancer is rare, and accounts for only 1.3% of all new cancer cases in the U.S. Read more...

My mom, her two sisters and my grandma all developed ovarian cancer Should I get a hysterectomy after I'm done having kids to avoid cancer myself?

Genetic counseling. Yo u ask a very important and relevant questions. Prior to doing anything, strongly suggest you speak with a genetic counselor who can outline your and your offspring's risk of cancer, and as well any additional diagnostic tests that might be performed. Good luck. Read more...