Can I have breast reconstruction at the same time as mastectomy?

Most women can. Immediate breast reconstruction allows the patient to wake up from the surgery "whole" and avoid the experience of a flat chest. Having the reconstruction at the same time typically leads to nicer results and less scarring compared to delayed reconstruction (reconstruction performed some time after mastectomy). Most women with early breast cancer (stage 1 or 2) or brca+ are candidates.
Depends. Depends on you, your cancer and your plastic surgeon. Talk with your oncologist and your surgeon about immediate breast reconstruction.
Absolutely. There are caveats depending on the extent and type of cancer you have at the time of surgery.
Usually. Immediate reconstruction avoids image of no breast mound but also allows preservation of the skin envelope (if it's not directly involved by the cancer) and sometimes the nipple complex. This may afford a more natural look/feel. A complicating factor is need for postmastectomy radiation esp. If a tissue recon is planned. Review your options with your breast surgeon and consult with plastic surgeon.
Maybe. Depends on the reason for mastectomy, whether you will need radiation and many other factors. Always a good idea to see a plastic surgeon before the mastectomy so that you plan for the best outcome. Make sure that your breast surgeon is very experienced in breast cancer - typically with a surgical oncology or breast surgery fellowship (or a general surgeon with lots of breast surgery experience).
Generally yes. Though there are reasons not to perform reconstruction at the time of mastectomy, most women will be good candidates to have concurrent surgery. However, most will need one or more surgeries depending on the type of reconstruction. It is best to ask questions and discuss all the options with your reconstructive surgeon.

Related Questions

Could I have breast reconstruction at the same time as my mastectomy?

Yes. Breast reconstruction is often done at the same time as mastectomy, depending on the type of reconstruction and the type of breast cancer. Inflammatory breast cancer is one type where reconstruction should not be done right away. Your breast surgeon and your plastic surgeon will work together to determine what's right for you. Read more...
Yes. Not everyone wants a reconstruction, but, if you do, i think it is almost always best to have it done at the same time. For one, you save yourself from having an additional anesthetic; also, it saves you from the emotional aspect of the appearance of your chest wall without a breast. Read more...
Yes... In general, most woman can have reconstruction at the time of mastectomy, but there are limitations based on pre-existing medical problems or smoking. Speak to a plastic and reconstructuve surgeon to find out your options. Read more...
Yes. In fact, most centers insist that you meet with a reconstructive surgeon at the time of your diagnosis to discuss all the options that are available to you. Since everyone is different, your options may be different than another person with the same set of circumstances. Insist on speaking with a plastic surgeon prior to any surgery. All related reconstruction is generally covered by insurance. Read more...
Most women can. Immediate breast reconstruction allows the patient to wake up from the surgery "whole" and avoid the experience of a flat chest. Having the reconstruction at the same time typically leads to nicer results and less scarring compared to delayed reconstruction (reconstruction performed some time after mastectomy). Most women with early breast cancer (stage 1 or 2) or brca+ are candidates. Read more...

Is it safe to have breast reconstruction done at the same time as a mastectomy? My surgeon has said we can do the mastectomy and then immediately do the breast reconstruction. I like the idea, but am worried about the extra time that would take. Is it saf

Although . Although there are never any guarantees, your surgeon's opinion should be your guide. If it is necessary to have post mastectomy radiation treatments, you may face increased post operative complications. Individualized care is why you have "your" surgeon. Read more...
Immediate . Immediate reconstruction after the mastectomy is a plus in many ways. So if you are a candidate for the procedure, it should be safe from the surgeon's point of view. Good luck from nyc. For more info visit www.Drgrossman.Com. Read more...
A very good option. A very good and safe option. Advantages: keeping the natural breast skin ("skin sparing mastectomy"), less scarring and the patient wakes up from the surgery "complete", avoiding the experience of a flat chest. Sometimes "nipple-sparing mastectomy" can be performed which preserves the nipple and areola as well as the breast skin. Most women with early breast cancer (stage i or 2) are candidates. Read more...
Breast Cancer. This is a great question. The issue is how safe is it to be under anesthesia for longer periods of time. The short answer is it is very safe. I perform the diep flap breast reconstruction surgery and it takes longer because of all of the steps. These patients do extremely well after surgery and have had the benefit of removal of the lower abdominal tissue just like I do for a tummy tuck. Read more...
Immediate recon. It is actually safer to have one long operation than 2 short operations, as the most complicated parts of anesthesia are waking you up and putting you to sleep. However, there is a higher reported incidence of complications from immediate reconstruction than delayed. The benefit of talking to a board certified plastic surgeon is that they can help you make the choices that best fit your values. Read more...
Yes,if no radiation. Yes immediate reconstruction is a common and safe procedure if no radiation is being planned post-op. The additional time is dependent on the type of reconstruction being done. If you haven't had a chance to get all your questions answered, please go back in and see your reconstructive surgeon and he/she will be happy to address those for you. All of us want our patients to have a safe treatment. Read more...
Yes. An expander can be placed at the time of mastectomy. This is a temporary space filler that allows you to complete chemo and/or radiation and then complete the final reconstruction months later. This is know as immediate-delayed reconstruction. Speak with the breast surgeon and plastic surgeon for details. Read more...
In most cases. Immediate breast reconstruction is offered when it will not interfere with the treatment of your breast cancer. There are a few situations where delayed reconstruction is recommended, not because the added surgery is unsafe, but because the expander or implant may make detection of recurrence or treatment more difficult (uncommon). Delay is most often recommended for larger, more aggressive tumor. Read more...

Does the same surgeon who does the mastectomy also do the breast reconstruction? I got a referral to an excellent surgeon for my mastectomy, and during the consult, he told me I should think about whether I want an immediate breast reconstruction. It didn

Hello, . Hello, first, best wishes getting well from your upcoming mastectomy. Hope it turns out great. It is not common for a mastectomy performed for breast cancer and its reconstruction to be performed by the same surgeon. Most commonly a general surgeon with expertise in breast conditions performs the mastectomy and lymph node biopsies. Either under the same anesthesia or later, a plastic surgeon can perform your breast reconstruction. Be sure to request a consult with you surgeons' favorite plastic surgeon immediately. Having lots of time ahead of surgery to assimilate all this new information is time well spent, although i sympathize that it is stressful and exhausting to have to make all these decisions. Dan downey md facs. Read more...
Generally . Generally speaking, one surgeon will perfrom your mastectomy, and a secnd surgeon will perform your breast reconstruction. It is very helpful to speak to a reconstructive surgeon prior to your mastectomy. The plastic surgeon will help determine whether you are a candidate for nipple sparing mastectomy, whether you might wish to consider bilateral mastectomy and reconstruction, whether you are a candidate for immediate reconstruction or delayed reconstruction, whether you are a candidate for single stage reconstruction, and what type of reconstruction best fits your body type and your goals. The plastic surgeon will also discuss symmetry, or matching surgery, with you and nipple reconstruction. You do not have to have immediate reconstruction if you are not ready for it! although it can seem overwhelming, trust me that in the end, you will feel musch more satfisfied and in control of your life by researching your options. Your breast surgeon should be able to provide one or more referrals for you if you don't have a specific plastic surgeon in mind. Read more...
Most . Most of the time mastectomy and reconstruction is performed by different doctors who all work in a team approach. Good luck from nyc. For more info visit www.Drgrossman.Com. Read more...
Usually. Generally speaking, surgery done for treatment of breast cancer is done by one surgeon and surgery done for “reconstruction” is done by another. However, there are a few surgeons who have been well-trained/experienced with both types of surgery. Hopefully, your surgeon will be able to refer you to a plastic surgeon who he/she has confidence in. Best wishes with your treatment plan. Read more...
Breast cancer. Typically the breast surgeon has a relationship with a plastic surgeon(s) to perform reconstruction. It is important to be seen and evaluated for all forms of breast reconstruction. Although this is a very stressful time it is important to have all the information regarding your surgical options. In many instances not enough time is given to this portion of a patients care! Read more...
No,a plastic surgeon. No, usually your breast oncologic surgeon performs the mastectomy and refres you for reconstruction to a plastic & reconstructive surgeon.An immediate breast reconstruction is a common procedure that is performed at the same time as the mastectomy.The type of surgery varies depending on your choice, your body size and shape and your plastic surgeon.Creation of a breast mound is the first operation. Read more...

If cancer comes back in the same breast after having a breast-sparing surgery, will I need a mastectomy then? Will I be able to have breast reconstruction even though I have had radiation?

Yes. Yes to both. Since you can't have radiation twice in the same breast, most women need a mastectomy if the cancer returns after breast-sparing surgery. You have several reconstruction options after previous radiation, depending on how your breast tissue responded to radiation. Talk to a plastic surgeon about options. Read more...
Maybe. Recurrence after radiation most often means mastectomy. Unfortunately, after radiation for breast cancer, the tissue is changed in a way that limits the options for reconstruction. Ordinarily the simplest method uses a tissue expander followed by an implant, but radiated tissue doesn't expand well and capsular contracture is common. Flaps such as diep or tram are preferable in that instance. Read more...
Yes. Under normal circumstances, several reconstructive options can be offered to you after breast conservation surgery and/or radiation. In most cases, radiation can not be offered again due to limits of the body to a lifetime dose of radiation. Reconstruction after breast sparing surgery is still a very common occurrence. Speak to a plastic surgeon regarding all the options. Read more...
Maybe. As far as mastectomy with recurrence, the best person to speak to is your breast surgeon as they should be aware of the most recent studies on radiation and recurrence. As far as reconstruction, implants are more complicated with radiation and generally a flap reconstruction is a better alternative. The best option is to speak with a board certified plastic surgeon about this. Read more...
Yes to both. If the breast has already been irradiated and a cancer recurs, the only option is mastectomy. Breast reconstruction is usually possible; but choices are limited, the procedure must be done cautiously, and the complication rate is higher. Read more...
Yes & qualified Yes. Local recurrence in a previously radiated breast makes reconstruction riskier and more difficult. If there is marked skin thickening and fibrosis or deformity, flap reconstruction is probably a better choice. If those findings do not pertain, methods using expanders and prostheses plus allpoderm (which require no donor site)can be tried first, saving a flap as a "backup"or "lifeboat" operation. Read more...
Yes. Most women that suffer a recurrence of their breast cancer in the same breast after breast conservation (lumpectomy and radiation) go on to have a mastectomy. It is certainly possible to have breast reconstruction even though you have had previous radiation. Read more...
Breast cancer. Yes you can have breast reconstruction. If there is a recurrence after lumpectomy and radiation then after your work up you choose to have a mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction i typically recommend the use if your own tissue for the reconstruction. Several wound healing issues can develop on previously radiated and operated tissues. Read more...
Mastectomy. Was mandatory before nsabp b-04. Little data trying to conserve after an in breast relapse, and all would first offer mastectomy. A second breast salvage is unproven. Excision + partial breast option would be an outside the norm discussion. Breast reconstruction, immediate or later, can be done, on case by case basis. Discuss with your provider team. Read more...
Yes,?implant ?tummy. The option of breast reconstruction is always available for majority of patients undergoing cancer treatment. If the longterm radiation effect on the tissues is limited and you don't require expansion then a one stage implant breast mound reconstruction is still possible but commonly an autogenous tissue reconstruction is required if radiation damage is more severe. Be sure to get brca gene tested. Read more...

How is breast reconstruction done after mastectomy?

Tram flap. One of the common methods is by using the tram flap which is use of patients own abdominal muscle and skin paddle to create breast mound. Read more...
Lots of ways. There are many options these days for reconstruction; some simple and some complex depending on each patients needs and desires. Talk with a plastic surgeon or try www.Plasticsurgery.Org. Good luck. Read more...
Several options. Breast reconstruction uses the patient's own tissue (from another part of the body) or a breast implant. More than 1 surgery is usually needed to complete the reconstruction. The degree of scarring, recovery and risks vary depending on the technique used. The nipple and areola can also be reconstructed. Some patients also have surgery on the other breast for best symmetry. Read more...
Several options. A complete history and exam are needed to determine the best procedure for each individual. Flaps or tissue transferred from another part of the body can be used to reconstruct the breast. Or expansion and subsequent implant placement can also be performed. Read more...

Is a breast reconstruction recommended after a mastectomy?

IndividualPreference. I would consider it an option rather than a recommendation. In my experience, this decision comes very easily to most women who are faced with the need to have a mastectomy--i have met very few women who are on the fence with regard to this. Like any operation, there are pro's and con's, but it is rare that we cannot offer some form of reconstruction to anyone who desires this. Read more...
Up to the patient. This is a complex question, but in almost all cases the choice is up to the patient. Reconstruction can be done at the time of mastectomy or later on; both have advantages and disadvantages. I would recommend consultation with one or more plastic surgeons experienced in breast reconstruction to explore the options in your particular case. Read more...
Elective. It is possible in the healthy patient but it is a "patient's choice" item. It is elective. Read more...
Personal choice. Breast reconstruction isn't for everyone but it certainly offers several benefits. The most significant benefit is not having to experience living without a breast. Reconstruction can be performed at the same time as the mastectomy ("immediate reconstruction"), or any time after ("delayed reconstruction"). There are many reconstructive options ranging from breast implants to using your own tissue. Read more...
Recommended. Some patients would prefer to have immediate breast reconstruction surgery, especially if their mastectomy is for preventing high risk of breast cancer. If the patient has to undergo additional treatments such as chemotherapy or radiation, then a delayed breast reconstruction surgery may be recommended. https://www.mwbreast.com/breast-reconstruction-timing-immediate-vs-delayed-infographic/ Read more...

What is involved with post mastectomy breast reconstruction?

Lots of options. Reconstruction can be performed either immediately (begun) at the time of mastectomy or later after recovery. The two main techniques are either using implants with or without tissue expansion and using your own body tissue. You should consult with at least one plastic surgeon at the recommendation of your primary physician, ob/gyn or breast surgeon. A team approach is best. Read more...
Individual planning. This a complex problem that requires that your surgical plan be coordinated with your treatment team. Depending on many factors the reconstruction should be individualized to your needs. Read more...
Reconstruction. Post mastectomy reconstruction is best treated through a multidisciplinary approach. The reconstructive plastic surgeon should be involved early to help determine the incisions, the eventual reconstruction choices and options, and to advise the patient on the aesthetic ramifications of choosing breast conservation vs mastectomy. Timing, implants or tissue are all choices that have to be made. Read more...
Multiple steps. There are several reconstructive options which can be performed at the same time as mastectomy or any time later. Not everyone is a candidate for immediate reconstruction. Options range from breast implants to "flap" surgery which use the patient's own tissue to recreate a "natural", warm, soft breast. The nipple and areola can also be reconstructed. Typically more than one surgery is required. Read more...

Can you tell me about breast reconstruction after mastectomy and complications?

Breast Cancer. This is a great question. The issue is how safe is it to be under anesthesia for longer periods of time. The short answer is it is very safe. I perform the diep flap breast reconstruction surgery and it takes longer because of all of the steps. These patients do extremely well after surgery and have had the benefit of removal of the lower abdominal tissue just like I do for a tummy tuck. Read more...

If I am advised to have a mastectomy, what are the risks and benefits of immediate breast reconstruction?

Significant. Immediate reconstruction is assocaited with wound healing and cosmetic issues, depending on whether muscle flaps or breast implants are used and whether radiation is to be done. Read more...
BENEFITS>risks. Almost all women who require a mastectomy may be given the option of reconstruction. The major benefit of immediate reconstruction is avoiding an extra operation and the emotional effects of having no breast. Furthermore, as many as 1/3 of all women who plan on having a delayed reconstruction never bother. Rarely, we prefer to delay reconstruction for follow-up of an aggressive breast cancer. Read more...
Benefits. The biggest benefit of immediate reconstruction is that you have the best chance at creating a natural shape to the breast and having it done in one surgery rather than multiple surgery. Since the majority of the breast skin is left in a mastectomy and the shape loss is limited, there is somewhat of a "blueprint" to work with. Read more...
Several. Benefits include less scarring, better cosmetic results, and not having to experience being without a breast. Risks include failure of the reconstruction, infection, bleeding, sensation loss, asymmetry, blood clots, ugly scarring, dissatisfaction with the cosmetic results and need for more surgery. Implant reconstruction risks also include hardening, rippling, rupture, and need for replacement. Read more...
Immediate breast rec. The benefits of immediate reconstruction include the amount of skin available to cover a flap, or implants, the reduced number of surgeries, the psychological benefit, and perhaps, superior cosmetics. The downside is a higher risk of complications, and possible changes in therapy, such as radiation, based on the final pathology, that may affect the quality of the reconstruction. Read more...