How common is restrictive cardiomyopathy?

Unusual to rare. The most common form of restrictive CM is cardiac amyloid, of which there are many types. Other causes are sarcoidosis, endocardial fibroelastosis, and other very rare causes.

Related Questions

What is the common cause of restrictive cardiomyopathy?

Amyloid. Restrictive or infiltrative cardiomyopathies are usually caused by amyloid, sarcoid, scleroderma, endocardial fibrosis/fibroelastosis, hemochromatosis, radiation, and idiopathic. Read more...
Amyloid. By far the most common cause is deposition of amyloid protein in the heart. Restrictive physiology is the end-stage result of most other types of heart failure as well, but we don't call that a restrictive cardiomyopathy. Read more...

What can be done for restrictive cardiomyopathy disease?

No easy answer. Adults with restrictive cardiomyopathy have a prolonged course of heart failure, with fatigue, shortness of breath, and worsening activity tolerance. Patients ultimately die of heart failure unless they become candidates for a heart transplant. Blood clots in the heart can be another cause of complications and death in these patients. Read more...

How do you make the diagnosis of restrictive cardiomyopathy?

Difficult. Restrictive cardiomyopathy is a decrease in filling volume and a decrease in compliance usually due to an infiltrative process. Examples like hemochromatosis with iron depositon in the heart muscle. Or amyloid with abnormal protien depostion in heart. Diagnosis will come from labs, right heart cath , MRI scan of heart, and ocasionally biopsy. Read more...

What is the prognosis for people with restrictive cardiomyopathy?

Depends. It depends on the cause of the restrictive cardiomyopathy (rcm). Rcm from a condition such as hemochromoatosis may stabilize with treatment of the underlying condition. A condition such as amyloidosis may continue to progress. Progression of the rcm continues to impair the heart's ability to relax and fill with blood. This can cause progressive problems with the liver and lungs. Read more...
Typically not good. There are several causes of restrictive cardiomyopathy, so the prognosis is variable, but is typically limited due to progression of heart failure and potential for heart rhythm problems. Depending on the cause, there are certain medications and other therapies available. Some people may be able to pursue heart transplantation, depending on the cause. Read more...

What drugs are used to treat restrictive cardiomyopathy, what are their dosages and how often are they taken?

This is too complex. To answer adequately...First item is what is causing restriction? See a cardiologist please. Read more...
Difficult. Restrictive cardiomyopathy can be very challenging to treat. The main avenues for treatment are diuretics to keep excess fluid off the body and blood pressure control of which there are many different choices. I would recommend finding a good heart failure cardiologist to work with. Read more...

What is the treatment for restrictive cardiomyopathy?

Depends on cause. Restrictive cardiomyopathy is caused by several different abnormalities, usually an infiltration of an abnormal chemical, such as iron in hemochromatosis, amyloid in amyloidosis, or sarcoidosis. Restrictive cardiomyopathy can also be caused by an abnormal thickening and stiffening of the pericardium which is the lining around the heart, the treatment of which is removing the pericardium. Read more...

What are the treatments for restrictive cardiomyopathy?

Very few. Assuming that you're talking about restrictive instead of constrictive pericarditis, the problem is usually deposition of material into the heart itself. Since this material cannot usually be removed, the treatment is often aimed at the symptoms unless the heart itself is replaced with transplant. Read more...