Joint hypermobility cause of tendonitis?

Sometimes. One of the potential causes of tendonitis is overuse by the muscle/tendon unit trying to stabilize a hypermobile joint. This is certainly the case with the posterior tibial tendon in individuals with flexible flatfoot. However, not all tendinitis is related to joint hypermobility, so you would need to consult with your doctor to determine the cause of your tendinitis.
Potentially. Yes, can potentially be cause although there can be other factors as well such as overuse or inflammation.

Related Questions

Are joint hypermobility and tendonitis related?

Joint hypermobility. Yes hypermobile joins can cause tendinitis, bursitis, frequent sprains, early onset osteoarthritis, subluxation and dislocations more common in shoulders, knee pain, herniated disc, clicking joins, TMJ syndrome, carpal tunnel symdrome andgrowing pain in children. All these are caused by instability in various joints. Read more...
Sort of. There is some evidence that those with hypermobilty are at increased risk of sprains and strains, although there also exists some evidence to the contrary. Pathophysiologically speaking, I am not aware of any studies implicating changes in the structure of tendons among individuals with hypermobility. Read more...

What is the connection between joint hypermobility and tendonitis?

Overstretching tendo. With increased ability for joints to move more than the normal range, the tendons (muscle to bone connectors) and ligaments (bone to bone connecters) get over stretched causing micro tears and inflammation from the excessive range of motion. This is the connection between hyper mobility and inflamed tendons. Read more...
Sort of. There is some evidence that those with hypermobilty are at increased risk of sprains and strains, although there also exists some evidence to the contrary. Pathophysiologically speaking, I am not aware of any studies implicating changes in the structure of tendons among individuals with hypermobility. With that said, over stretching and hence injury to tendons theoretically makes sense. Read more...

Can joint hypermobility syndrome cause referred pain? If so, what is the best way to help with the pain?

Hypermobility. Hypermobility can be assoc. with joint pain esp. if you've dislocated a joint or sustained an injury to the joint. Referred pain means, pain in another area (related) to the primary site often on the same side. It is difficult to be more precise with your question. Look at hypermobility support groups: http://hypermobility.org/ Keep your muscles, tendons strong with appropriate PT. Read more...