Can someone have a myocardial perfusion scan with a pacemaker?

Yes. Yes, patients with implanted pacemakers have nuclear stress tests/myocardial perfusion scans. The EKG portion of the test will reflect the pacemaker (and likely a left bundle branch block) but reversible ischemia can still be detected in the scans.
Yes. A pacemaker should not adversely affect the myocardial perfusion scan in any way and you should be confident going ahead with the scan. The scan will not harm the pacemaker.

Related Questions

What is the purpose of a myocardial perfusion scan?

Nuclear stress test. This is a specialized form of stress test used to confirm the presence of coronary artery disease in patients suspected of having this problem. It uses a low-level nuclear tracer to assess blood flow to the heart muscle before and after exercise-induced stress. In patients who cannot exercise, other pharmacologic means can be used such as adenosine, lexiscan, persantine, or dobutamine. Read more...
Assess risk. 1. Determine blood flow to the heart at rest and at stress. The difference between these two can help determine risk of a major cardiac event such as a heart attack. 2. Determine cardiac size. 3. Determine cardiac function (left ventricular ejection fraction). 4. Determine exercise capacity. 5. Determine electrical (ECG) response to stress. These factors are used to help guide medical therapy. Read more...
Cardiac blood supply. A cardiac perfusion scan measures the amount of blood supplied to your heart muscle. Radiotracers such as thallium or technetium sestamibi are injected intravenously and travel through blood to heart muscle. Two sets of images are made during rest and exercise and compared. Indications for this study include chest pain, previous heart attack, heart surgery and coronary artery disease. Read more...

What is the function of a myocardial perfusion scan?

Blood flow to heart. It shows blood flow to the heart. It can show old scar of a heart attack or heart muscle that is not getting enough blood , which could mean a future heart attack. Read more...
Assess risk. 1. Determine blood flow to the heart at rest and at stress. The difference between these two can help determine risk of a major cardiac event such as a heart attack. 2. Determine cardiac size. 3. Determine cardiac function (left ventricular ejection fraction). 4. Determine exercise capacity. 5. Determine electrical (ECG) response to stress. These factors are used to help guide medical therapy. Read more...
Detection of angina. A myocardial perfusion study is performed in order to detect blockage of the coronary (heart) arteries using intravenous injection of radiotracers which will have a distribution proportional to the blood flow. Studies are performed at rest and after stress or pharmacological stress and then compared to each other. This will help detecting ischemia ( angina) or infarction (heart attack). Read more...

Can someone drive home after a myocardial perfusion scan?

Yes. You can drive home unless you are administered a medication for relaxation during the test as is sometimes necessary for people with severe claustrophobia. However, this is very, very rare because nuclear cameras are so open. Nearly 100% of the people who get a myocardial perfusion scan can drive home safely after the test. Read more...
Yes. No sedatives or anesthesia is used for myocardial scans. Isotopes that selectively go to heart muscle are used. These radio pharmaceuticals do not have any effect that would prevent driving home. If test includes physical stress, patient will recover to normal state before leaving department. Cardiologist is continually monitoring heart beat, blood pressure, etc. Read more...

What are the risks in having a myocardial perfusion scan?

Minimal . There is a small amount of radiation from the scan but it is less than from a cat scan. If you do an exercise stress test, there is a small risk from the exercise portion but you are continuously monitored for any problems. Your job is to report any difficulties or symptoms during the test. Read more...
About 5 in 10,000. The risk of a resting only perfusion scan is close to zero, the only risks being an allergic reaction to the tracer, pain from the iv, and discomfort from lying still for about 20 minutes. The real risk is from performing the treadmill (or pharmacologic) stress test itself. The historical risk of an adverse event from this is about 5 in 10, 000 but probably now much lower given modern equipment. Read more...
Stress associated . A myocardial perfusion scan is performed in two steps. One injection of a radiotracer at rest and another at stress ( either treadmill or pharmacological stress test with adenosine, regadenoson, dobutamine, dipyridamole). Only few skin reactions have been reported with the radiotracer injection. Risks are more associated with the stress used for the test such has angina, headache, nausea... Read more...

Could you have a myocardial perfusion scan if you suffer from myoclonic dystonia?

Stress test. It is paramount that the patient is completely still when undergoing myocardial perfusion scanning -- therefore if the myoclonic dystonia is well controlled then you could probably have the scan -- otherwise you have other option of stress and imaging modality. Read more...
Probably not. In most clinics, you will need to stay still for 20 to 30 minutes while being scanned. If unable to do this, you may want to investigate other imaging tests such as stress echo or cardiac ct. Read more...