Question about hereditary colon cancer. Can it skip generations?

Yes. The genes that contribute to colon cancer are related to how cells grow or repair themselves. Skipping a generation may mean that the gene is not fully expressed or that other environmental factors did not quite tip the balance in favor of cancer.

Related Questions

Question about hereditary colon cancer: which kinds are inherited or run in families?

Colon cancer. Genetic succeptibility for colon cancer includes hereditary nonpolyposis colonrectal cancer (lynch syndrome), & famiial adenomatous polyposis. Read more...
Several. The types of colorectal cancers you refer to include hnpcc (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer) and fap (familial adenomatous polyposis). However, each of these can also arise form a new mutation with no family history. Garden variety colorectal cancer also has some heritability, though far less than those noted above. Read more...

Can you explain hereditary colon cancer?

Broad. That is a broad question and the answer is a book chapter. The key points for you are that if you have relatives with many polyps or relatives with colon cancer, you should go to your doctor to asses your risk. Read more...
Not in 400 character. Many genes are linked with an increased risk of colon cancer (and others), so those with a family history of colon, uterine and other cancers are at increased risk as they may inherit these genes from their parents. Genetic testing can pinpoint some of these genes and thus indicate whether you are at increased risk, thus allowing earlier detection/prevention/treatment so get checked if this appies. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: Hereditary colon cancer?

5-10% of colon CA's. ...include: familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and Lynch syndrome, also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). In addition, some rare conditions – including attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis (AFAP) and MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP). Read: https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/risk-assessment-screening/hereditary-genetics/genetic-counseling/inherited-risk-colorectal. Read more...

What are the symptoms of hereditary colon cancer?

Similar to regular. Colon cancer. There are a number of different hereditary abnormalities that lead to colon cancer, but the resulting colon cancer is often silent in early stages. The usual symptoms are intestinal obstruction, anemia, weight loss and symptoms due to spread to other organs. Read more...
None. Colon cancer does not cause symptoms unless advanced. Definitely bleeding rectally is one that you should not ignore. Read more...

What is the treatment for hereditary colon cancer?

Depends. There are a number of inherited defects that may lead to colon cancer. In some cases, e.g. Apc, a prophylactic colectomy is advisable. In most cases the treatment is the same as for sporadic cancer. Read more...
Timming. This question will depend in many factors. I recommend seeing a professional and that way the answer is specific to your situation. www.drlugo.com. Read more...

Can pancreatic/biliary duct, stomach, colon cancer or leukemia skip a generation?

Variable. Family incidence doesn't mean you will have the disease only that you MAY get it and should be more vigilant. For example colon cancer. Start colonoscopy at age 30 rather than 50, etc.. Read more...

Does pancreatic/biliary duct, stomach, colon cancer or leukemia skip a generation? Please, need some answers?

Unrelated. These tumors are independent and unrelated to a genetic passing down of a familial situation such as with the BRACA gene in breast cancer. Genetic association occurs in about 5% of cases and 95% of cancers are due to contact with carcinogens or viruses. It has now been shown that intrinsic gene factors can be passed down and skip a generation such as with the partial sequence of the MMTV virus. Read more...

Chance that 4 CT scans over 2 1/2 years would all miss sympotomatic colon cancer (narrow stool, occasion blood), also sigmoidscope to 35 cm.

Fairly high risk. CT scans are NOT good tools for looking inside the bowel. Endoscopy is the preferred tool, but a sigmoidoscopy, at its best, misses looking at half the colon. A look to merely 35 cm has missed about 85-90% of the colon. The usual method to evaluate the colon is a complete colonoscopy. Read more...