15 doctors weighed in:
Can you take ritalin, (methylphenidate) dexedrine, or Adderall for add/adhd?
15 doctors weighed in

Dr. Rudolf Brutoco
Pediatrics - Psychiatry
8 doctors agree
In brief: Yes, all are OK.
There are similarities in these 3 meds, though dex & Adderall (dextroamphetamine and racemic amphetamine) are more closely related.
It depends on each individual which is a better med. And, it depends on the dose, the form the med is taken in, the dosing frequency -- and it may depend on what other meds are utilized. This is not amateur hour, so get good professional help.

In brief: Yes, all are OK.
There are similarities in these 3 meds, though dex & Adderall (dextroamphetamine and racemic amphetamine) are more closely related.
It depends on each individual which is a better med. And, it depends on the dose, the form the med is taken in, the dosing frequency -- and it may depend on what other meds are utilized. This is not amateur hour, so get good professional help.
Dr. Rudolf Brutoco
Dr. Rudolf Brutoco
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Dr. Glen Elliott
Pediatrics - Psychiatry
8 doctors agree
In brief: Yes, all are good
Stimulants available in the us come in two classes--methylphenidate (ritalin, concerta, focalin, (dexmethylphenidate) etc.
) and amphetamine (dexedrine, adderall, vyvanse). The two work slightly differently but are comparably effective and have similar side effects. Studies show about 65% respond well to first stimulant they take; another 20% will respond to the other class if the first doesn't work.

In brief: Yes, all are good
Stimulants available in the us come in two classes--methylphenidate (ritalin, concerta, focalin, (dexmethylphenidate) etc.
) and amphetamine (dexedrine, adderall, vyvanse). The two work slightly differently but are comparably effective and have similar side effects. Studies show about 65% respond well to first stimulant they take; another 20% will respond to the other class if the first doesn't work.
Dr. Glen Elliott
Dr. Glen Elliott
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Dr. Thomas Seck
Pediatrics
7 doctors agree
In brief: Yes
Those are all medications that are and have been used to treat adhd.
There are newer medications that tend to last longer and have fewer side effects, but the older medicines are still being used.

In brief: Yes
Those are all medications that are and have been used to treat adhd.
There are newer medications that tend to last longer and have fewer side effects, but the older medicines are still being used.
Dr. Thomas Seck
Dr. Thomas Seck
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1 comment
Dr. Glen Elliott
They not only are still being used, they often have advantages as well as disadvantages, compared to the newer preparations. About 90% of individuals with ADHD whould be able to find a medication that they tolerate well and from which they get good benefits.
Dr. Carla Enriquez
Pediatrics
6 doctors agree
In brief: Of course
A stimulant, whether amphetamine or methylphenidate class, is the drug of choice for adhd, adult, adolescent, or child.
These meds increase Dopamine and norepinephrine in nerve connections called synapses. This is where information exchange and learning occurs in brain. These are among the safest and most effective meds we have. Safer than tylenol (acetaminophen) or penicillin.

In brief: Of course
A stimulant, whether amphetamine or methylphenidate class, is the drug of choice for adhd, adult, adolescent, or child.
These meds increase Dopamine and norepinephrine in nerve connections called synapses. This is where information exchange and learning occurs in brain. These are among the safest and most effective meds we have. Safer than tylenol (acetaminophen) or penicillin.
Dr. Carla Enriquez
Dr. Carla Enriquez
Thank
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Pediatrics - Developmental & Behavioral
2 doctors agree
In brief: As a person ages,
symptoms of Hyperactivity/Impulsivity tend to diminish leaving an inner sense of restlessness, fidgetiness, inability to remain seated during meetings, etc.
while clinically significant symptoms of Inattention persist, changing the diagnosis from ADHD-Combined Type to ADHD-Primarily Inattentive Type, called ADD till the mid-1980's. Multimodal management including medications is still necessary.

In brief: As a person ages,
symptoms of Hyperactivity/Impulsivity tend to diminish leaving an inner sense of restlessness, fidgetiness, inability to remain seated during meetings, etc.
while clinically significant symptoms of Inattention persist, changing the diagnosis from ADHD-Combined Type to ADHD-Primarily Inattentive Type, called ADD till the mid-1980's. Multimodal management including medications is still necessary.
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Thank
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