Developmental hip dysplasia. Any follow-up needed after age 2 years?

Yes. Developmental hip dysplasia occurs in approximately 0.4 % of births. Result of treatment depend on early diagnosis and treatment institution. Between birth & 6 months of age we use the pavlik harness, between 6 months & 1 yr of age following general anesthesia and reduction a spica cast is used. After age 1 surgery may be needed followed by a spica cast. Follow up is needed.
Yes. This should be followed as a child and later after skeletal maturity to ensure that there is adequate coverage of the femoral head. Inadequate coverage can lead to early arthritis.

Related Questions

Is developmental hip dysplasia common? Is 2-3 kids out of a 1000 common or considered rare? How often is developmental hip dysplasia missed?

Hip dysplasia is not. considered uncommon so the screening test for it should not be neglected. That is the reason why all infants are tested and continued to be tested throughout the first few years of life. Thanks for trusting in HealthTap. Read more...

Can you tell me about developmental hip dysplasia?

Yes, but... broad topic with several variations essentially the hip fails to form properlybecause the ball does not rest in the socket in the appropriate location early on in life sometimes this goes undetected because people do not have symptoms until later in life when they develop arthritis there is a broad spectrum relating to this disorder to have a specific discussion the spectrum would require xray s. Read more...

Is it possible to be diagnosed with a developmental hip dysplasia?

A few options. Strengthening the muscles around the hip will help a lot. You may want to consider some supplements like glucosamine, however recent research hasn't shown a lot of benefit. Other options include steroid injections, but these don't heal much. You can consider Synvisc (hylan g-f 20) or other joint fluid replacement injections and possible even platelet therapy injections or stem cell procedures. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: developmental hip dysplasia?

Abnormal hip. Development dysplasia of the hip (aka ddh) is a condition in which the normal development of the hip is altered. This problem can affect the acetabulum (the hip socket) and the upper end of the femur and femoral head. Early detection is critical to allow for early treatment. Untreated ddh can lead to hip arthritis. Read more...
See below. Ddh has multiple definitions. Typically it refers to patients who are born with a dislocated hip or instability. A broader definition is just abnormal growth of the hip. There are many many reasons why this happens. Read more...

Can hip stiffness be a symptom of developmental hip dysplasia?

Yes. Loss of motion can be symptomatic of many different things. The most common is osteoarthritis. In terms of dysphasia you will need an x-ray. If you are having hip problems and haven't seen anyone i suggest you see someone for an exam and xrays. Read more...

Any update on treatment for developmental hip dysplasia?

DDH. Really depends upon age and severity. Anything from observation, closed or open reduction, osteotomies (many types), hip scope with limited application, hip resurfacing, hip arthroplasty. Check with your orthopedic hip surgeon. Read more...
Hip dysplasia. You should have a careful physical examination and radiographic examination including special x rays, possibly ct scans and mris to determine degree of hip dysplasia (hip uncovering); this is important based on your age because if left untreated you may be setting yourself up for sooner rather than later hip problems. Read more...

Developmental hip dysplasia in a toddler with mild cerebral palsy, can you tell me more about this?

Hip dysplasia. The hip socket is a ball and socket joint. It forms correctly when the ball is sitting correctly in the "socket area" so the socket can develop correctly around it (this is not finished at birth yet). Because of the CP, the ball of the femur may not be sitting quite right and so the socket around it is not forming correctly, which could lead to problems as child starts/is walking. Read more...