Which is best chest CT vs chest mri?

It depends. Chest ct is more commonly used to evaluate the lungs, blood vessels, bones, and soft tissues. Chest mri, which takes longer to perform, is typically reserved for evaluation of diseases of the blood vessels (aorta, etc.), the heart, or masses that need to be further characterized. Chest ct is better at evaluating the lungs.
Different studies. Chest ct is fast and widely available. It allows for the rapid diagnosis of entities such as pulmonary embolism, aortic dissection and diseases of the lungs. Generally (though certain research centers are using more and more chest mri), chest MRI is reserved for the evaluation of the heart and surrounding vessels. Mri takes longer and is not as widely available. Chest ct does require radiation.

Related Questions

Is there any value in getting a chest mri? I am fearful of getting a chest CT and don't want the radiation. I've been having chronic chest pain.

Chest Scans. It is well known in medicine that chest scans are by far better with a ct scan than an mri. This is not the case for much of the rest of the body, but chest ct scan is the right test! Read more...

Up back pain for 1yr on right side. I have had 3 throastic mris. I have had mammogram and chest CT 9 months ago. Should I have MRI of chest?

More info needed. Where is the pain exactly? Assuming the t-spine mri's and ct were normal. Not uncommonly, problems in the mid to lower cervical spine can manifest as pain in the upper back, in and around the shoulder blades. Mri cervical spine can be considered if this is the case. A musculoskeletal ultrasound performed by an experienced doctor may provide the answer. Chest MRI unlikely to add benefit. Read more...

What happens during a chest MRI or ct?

Computerized section. Both MRI and ct mean getting sections of your body with the aid of computer. Only difference is in "how". Ct uses x-rays and MRI uses radiowaves in a magnetic field. You lay still inside a machine which lookd like a short tunnel (gantry) and these enregies (x-rays or radiowaves) go through your body and records the density of your tissue. The computer analyzes the density and display image. Read more...
Noninvasive exam. A chest ct is very quick. You are passed through a doughnut shaped machine. They may give you a fluid (contrast dye) through a vein but many chest ct exams are done without dye. Mri takes more time and the machine is tube like in nature. They may also give you a fluid into the vein. Both are not painful without any recovery. Can be done in hospital or radiology practice office. Read more...

Cardiac mri showed mod-large pericardial effusion 4 wks ago. Chest CT W/ CONTRAST showed no pericardial effusion. Why would that be. Is CT as good??

Timeline . The cardiac MRI ought to be very accurate. The CT scan too ought to be able to see a moderate-large pericardial effusion. The CT followed or preceded MRI? Perhaps there was interval resolution. You need to provide timeline of these 2 tests, any intervening treatment, etc etc. Read more...

How reliable are regular head MRI and chest CT scans to early detect potential recurrence of acinic cell carcinoma of parotid?

Recurrence. The chest ct won't include the parotid regions, and a standard head MRI won't adequately evaluate it, so neither is good for local recurrence. ct or MRI tailored to parotid would be necessary. Read more...

31/m c/o bilateral sharp CP x 6 mos., no known cause. Recent cta, ekgs, holter, echo, MRI chest, CT head are all negative. No prior history of any kind.?

Noncardiacchest pain. Since cardiac origins have been ruled out, most likely musculoskeletal. Can u reproduce the pain by pressing on the sore spots? Is pain along edges of sternum or at junction of rib bone with cartilage? May be costochondritis (inflammation of the above sites). Moist heat to areas as well as nsaids as directed should help. If bodybuilding, go easier on chest routines. Read more...
Chest wall pain. A healthy 31 Y.O. Male with above testing all negative rules out most serious causes. What could be left includes a chronic pleurisy (perhaps part of a connective tissue disease), costochondritis (inflammation of the conncection between the bony and cartilage parts of the rib cage). Consider a routine dose of an anti-inflammatory medication with your md's advice. Read more...