What is the role of fluoride in prevention of dental caries?

Stronger enamel. When the ph falls below 5.5, the tooth is demineralized destroying the enamel crystals. When the ph gets above 5.5 the enamel can get repaired using the calcium and phosphate in the saliva. If Fluoride is present the, new crystal= calcium+phosphate +fluoride and is more resistant to future acid attacks.
Alot. Flouride helps at many levels but it's primary way is when a acid produced by bacteria and sugar start to leach minerals out of the enamel, flouride, when found in the mouth, works its way back into tooth structure when remineralization takes place (with the help of ions in the saliva) and creates a tooth structure that is even more resistant to the acids bacteria cause.
Hardens enamel. The enzymes produced by bacteria have a harder time breaking though the enamel and setting up a cavity.
Antibacterial . In addition to hardening the tooth enamel, as the previous answers stated, Fluoride is also antibacterial. Bacterial will be decreased and will. To stick to, the teeth as well.

Related Questions

Does fluoride produce fluorapatite crystals to help prevent dental caries?

Esentially yes. Your teeth are primarily made up of hydroxyapetite and they get demineralized by acidic environments created by our food and bacteria in our mouth. Fluoride replaces the hydroxide and remineralizes and becomes fluorapetite which is actually stronger and more dense helping to reduce decay and prevent continued damage. Read more...

What are ways to explain to children the prevention of dental caries?

Teeth/Bacteria/Sugar. In order to have a cavity, three factors must be present. Teeth, sugar in foods & bacteria. The absence of any one of these three factors will prevent cavities. Two of these factors are non-negotiable, teeth and food, because we need them to live. Bacteria we can do without, except it grows back every day. Decreasing sticky sugars in our food and the bacteria in our mouth prevents caries. Read more...
Depends on age. Deep ding on the child's age make the explanations age appropriate because to much information for young children just confuses most of them. A basic discussion of germs eating food off their teeth and making holes is good for young ones. There are lots of books and even you tube videos to help. Read more...

How effective is fluoride (Biotene) for treating a cavity?

It depends. if the cavity is just beginning then high concentration of sodium fluoride might control the expansion of the cavity If you have a well established cavity then you need to have your dentist eliminate it and place a filling If you are prone to decay then you should be using a fluoride rinse and have excellent oral hygiene. Read more...

How effective are fluoride injections (Aquafresh) for treating a cavity?

Bunk. To treat decay the infected tooth material must be physically removed. Period. If the procedure you're inquiring about was effective, Dentists would have adopted it long ago. Read more...

My three year old needs more fluoride, I bought anti cavity toothpaste and floss. What else can I do to help her?

Xylitol, diet, pH. Xylitol is a 5 carbon sugar alcohol sweetner that helps fight decay. Be aware of the foods/ diet, try to avoid acidic foods, and as long as your dentist calculates how much fluoride-- there's also chewable Fluoride tabs...Don't overdo... No fluorosis. Read more...
See a pediatric dent. Flouride rinses and pills are only available by prescription avoid bottle water as most don't have fluoride. Read more...
Show your daughter . Show your daughter how to brush and floss, expecially the back teeth. Most people do not clean the back teeth well. Train her to do cleaning on a regular-daily basis. Flossing between teeth, where most cavities occur, and Fluoride will help prevent a cavity. I'm having some actually typing on this web site for some reason. The question above does not match additional patient info at all. Read more...
Limit Sugar. Limit the number of times the child is exposed to sugar containing items; juices, candy, even milk. Especially when putting them down for a nap or sleep. There are also xylitol containing drops that can be given to anybody to help fight cavities. Read more...
Fluoride adsorption. Fluoride works by adsorption, not absorption. Adsorption is the phenomena where substance exchanging ions at the surface. Enamel, composed of hydroxyappatitite, as the result of demineralization, lose the oh group in the hydroxyapatite structure and replace with with f ion in the fluoride. Read more...
Don't overdo it! Daily fluoridated tooth past use is often enough if used properly 2-3 times a day. Your dentist can help place Fluoride varnish after hygiene several times a year. Read more...

How are social class and dental caries related?

Diet. This is a generalization. Some social classes have diets that are high in carbohydrates (sugars). Access to care as well as making dental health a priority are also factors. Read more...
Differnet levels. Ther eis a theory since poorer people eat a high carbohydrate diet they are more prone to dental disease. More fast food and high sugar foods are eaten in lower social class people. Read more...
Money, money...money. Lower social class usually implies less income, and less income GREATLY limits regular evaluations by a Dentist. Hence cavities can be a problem in this group; but actually cavities can be a problem for even some College professors and hospital doctors. Read more...

Could dental caries really cause death in severe cases?

Yes. There have been reported deaths as the result of untreated dental caries (decay) leading to a significant abcess draining into the brain region. Read more...