Related Questions

What should someone do if he or she feels their heart flutter and race?

See physician. Everybody gets skipped beats, but a run of flutter or racing, especially if it takes your breath away, is reason to get seen for a thyroid check, ekg, rhythm study, and whatever else. Usually these are mild nuisances easily managed, but occasionally they warn of something dangerous. Good luck. Read more...
Depends. On severity & duration of symptoms. If fleeting probably just pacs or pvcs....In which case adequate hydration can be quite beneficial. If sustained may be an arrhythmia such as svt & evaluation required. Read more...

Can someone go out on permanent disability for 'heart flutter'?

Possible. It would depend on how disabling the symptoms are. Ordinarily, flutter can be controlled with medication or even cured with ablation, so flutter itself, if properly treated, would ordinarily not be disabling (well unless you are an airplane pilot for instance). Whether someone gets social security disabilty is determined by certain criteria but you can get a hearing before a judge if you disagree. Read more...

What are some of the symptoms of a heart flutter?

Chest sensation. If you mean atrial flutter that is a specific rhythm where the heart skips or beats fast causing a fluttering or skipping sensation in the chest which we call palpitations. This can eventually lead to shortness of breath, dizziness, even chest pain if the heart is beating fast enough. Read more...
Palpitations. Skipping or racing of the heart is often described as fluttering or palpitations. Many people have premature (early often called extra) beats which are not always felt. If extra beats were noted without symptoms in the absence of heart disease(after testing), usually no intervention is needed. Read more...

Can a heart flutter kill me?

A possibility . I am assuming u r taking about atrial flutter. A dangerous atrial arrhythmia. Associated with fibrillation too. If untreated an increase risk of a stroke can happen due to clot formation in your heart. Rate control with a blood thinner usual therapy. Conversion to regular sinus rhythm an option using drugs, electrical cardioversion or surgery. Close follow up with cardiologist very important. Read more...