12 doctors weighed in:
Why would a thyroidectomy final pathology report (not fna) be inconclusive (goiter vs follicular neoplasm)?
12 doctors weighed in

Dr. Liawaty Ho
Internal Medicine - Hematology & Oncology
8 doctors agree
In brief: Second opinion
If after a thyroidectomy, your local pathologist still can't differentiate between goiter or cancer ask your doc to request the pathologist to send the tissue to a bigger referral institution for a second opinion.

In brief: Second opinion
If after a thyroidectomy, your local pathologist still can't differentiate between goiter or cancer ask your doc to request the pathologist to send the tissue to a bigger referral institution for a second opinion.
Dr. Liawaty Ho
Dr. Liawaty Ho
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1 comment
Dr. Richard Orr
Have you seen the actual path report? Typically, goiter is a lay term and not often seen in path reports. If the pathologist is saying that it is totally benign, it really doesn't matter if it was a "goiter" or a follicular neoplasm. But, follicular neoplasms can be hard to distinguish from low grade follicular carcinoma, and eventually the pathologist has to make a call one way or the other. There are pathology endocrine experts available for second opinions in these difficult cases.
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: On a continuum
The truth is that common nodular goiter shows the same microscopic pattern and some of the same mutations as do the tame follicular neoplasms.
They're on a continuum. The burning question is really, "is this a malignant follicular neoplasm?" if the pathologist can say, "no", you're home free -- congratulations. Any concerns -- get a few more pathologists! good luck.

In brief: On a continuum
The truth is that common nodular goiter shows the same microscopic pattern and some of the same mutations as do the tame follicular neoplasms.
They're on a continuum. The burning question is really, "is this a malignant follicular neoplasm?" if the pathologist can say, "no", you're home free -- congratulations. Any concerns -- get a few more pathologists! good luck.
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Dr. Ed Friedlander
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Dr. Dan Fisher
Internal Medicine
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Medicine is hard
Nothing in medicine is ever black and white, and thyroid is notoriously hard to read.
Your pathologist probably has many years of looking at thyroid and would be happy to call it if they could... But sometimes cells don't talk.

In brief: Medicine is hard
Nothing in medicine is ever black and white, and thyroid is notoriously hard to read.
Your pathologist probably has many years of looking at thyroid and would be happy to call it if they could... But sometimes cells don't talk.
Dr. Dan Fisher
Dr. Dan Fisher
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