How much can walking reduce the risk of heart disease?

As much as many meds. Regular aerobic exercise lowers the blood pressure, raises the "good" HDL and improves sugar in diabetics. If it could be patented, walking would be a "wonder drug." get out there and do it!

Related Questions

Was fast walking (out in cold), my heart race/pound 120-150, started feeling hot and stinging. Normal BP 130/80 no heart disease anxiety?

PALPITATIONS W/U. CARDIAC WORK UP NEEDS TO Done exam/labs especially TFTS/EKG/Event Monitor/ECHO. If all testing is normal an EPS TEST NEEDS TO BE DONE TO TRY AND PROVOKE THE RYTHM. While you are waiting eliminate caffeine focus on staying hydrated. If palpitations worsen or syncope develops go directly to the ER stick to a GF diet WholeApproach.com gutbliss.com ANXIETY can also precipitate palpitations. Read more...

How long should you walk every day to prevent heart diseases?

As much as possible. Exercise is helpful to aid in the prevention of heart disease. Exercise like walking has an incredible number of beneficial effects. General guidelines recommend at least 20 minutes of vigorous walking several days a week. But like with everything else, don't over do it. Attempting high intensity without proper conditioning can result in injury. Questions? Ask your doc for an exercise rx/plan. Read more...
2000Kcal/week. You really don't prevent but rather delay the process. 2000kcal/week of aerobic excersice is advised. Your genetics and lifestyle determine your risk and outcome. Read more...
30 to 60 min. Regular walking can help, but in addition there is evidence that vigorous walking / jogging is also helpful. So both duration and intensity appear to be important. If you mix in high intensity, the exercise time required to get maximum benefits is decreased. Talk with your doc and a personal trainer. Also, balance exercises, calisthenics, stretching, and meditation may help you. Good luck! Read more...

Is it true that cocoa may reduce the risk of heart disease?

Cocoa. read this: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2797556/ if you don't like to read, it appears the answer to your question is .... maybe. Read more...