What is squamous cell vs basal cell skin cancer?

Different growth. Basal cell skin cancers often grow deeper and more destructive when left untreated causing large ulcerated areas. Squamous carcinomas more often spread radially and have a higher risk of spread to other organs if left untreated.
Different cell types. Squamous cell carcinomas are worse than basal cell carcinomas. Squamous cell carcinomas can metastasize where as basal cell carcinomas very rarely do. Both types occur more in sun exposed areas.
Both are NMSCs. Both are types of non-melanoma skin cancers (nmsc). Basal cell carcinoma (bcc) are the most common types of skin cancers. Bcc occur on sun exposed areas, are slow-growing, rarely spread, but can be locally destructive. Sqamous cell carcinoma (scc) usually start from sun-induced precancerous lesions (actinic keratosis) and then can progress to invasive tumors with risk of spread. See doc if worried.

Related Questions

What can you tell me about basal cell carcinoma and squamous skin cancer (basosquamous)?

Common skin cancers. Basal cell followed by squamous Ca are the more common skin lesions. Bas=al cell almost never metastasizes compared to sqaumous cell Ca where if left will eventaujally spread to regional nodes. Early treatment for both is with Efudex (fluorouracil) (5FU) cream. When squamous is aggressive it can be removed by Mohs paste. Should nodal spread occur with squamous CA surgery followed by RT may be necessary. Read more...

Am I at a higher risk for melanoma due to basal cell skin cancer?

Yes. Skin cancers are usually due to sun exposure. Having a non-melanoma skin cancer increases the risk of developing melanoma. Here is information from the national cancer institute. http://www.cancer.gov/melanomarisktool/melanoma-cancer-risk.html. Read more...
Melanoma . Skin cancers are linked to increased sun exposure and tanning beds. There are strong genetic components as well. You are statistically more likely to develop a melanoma in your lifetime having a history of basal cell. See your dermatologist for routine skin exams, reduce sun exposure, use sun protection , conduct self skin exams monthly. Read more...
Yes. Having one type of skin cancer does increase your risk of developing others. Read more...
Yes. Basal cell carcinoma is one o the most common malignancy in the us. Risk factors include uv radiation from sun exposure. This also increases your risk of melanoma. Make sure to get regular full body examinations from your dermatologist so any suspicious lesion can be caught early and biopsied. Read more...

Am I at higher risk for melanoma because I had basal cell skin cancer?

Yes. You are more prone to skin cancer and should be checked although the increase in melanomas not statistically dramatic. Read more...
Not directly. Basal cell carcinoma ;#40;bcc;#41; is the most common type of sun induced skin cancer. Melanoma is a distinct type of skin cancer, but both are related to sun exposure. Bcc normally does not present until later in life ;#40;65 yrs ; older;#41;. So if you get a bcc ; the younger you are means that you have had lots of sun damage ;/or have a skin type that is prone to burning. So you are also at risk for melanoma. Read more...
Not usually. Although both basal cell carcinoma and melanoma are related to sun exposure, having one doesn't mean your risk for getting the other is raised. However, you should have regular complete checks by a dermatologist as your overall risk of getting another skin cancer is higher. Read more...
Yes. Having one skin cancer does increase your risk for developing another. It is important that you limit your exposure to uv radiation, wear sunscreen and see your friendly dermatologist for routine skin examinations. Read more...

How long might one have basal cell skin cancer on his face without knowing it?

Basal cell cancer. Basal cell cancer, the second most common skin cancer, is very slow growing. Depending on the location, on how perceptive and how educated one is about these, it could be there for 1-2 years before drawing attention. Read more...
Greatly varies. It may take years before someone may become aware of a skin cancer. There are slow growing cancers that grow underneath the surface and are more difficult to detect. That's why someone may have a very large skin cancer (growing deep but not appearing on the surface) and not be aware until it's grown very big and appears on the surface. A skin cancer may pop up suddenly and grow fast within days. Read more...

For what length of time can you have a basal cell skin cancer on your face without knowing it?

Years sometimes. Basal cells start small and some can be very slow growing. Some people get used to them and don't worry unless they bleed or people start asking about them. They know they are there, they just ignore them. Read more...
One variety hides. Most forms of skin cancer grow outward an are noticed. One form, morpheaform looks like a flat white freckle and can go unnoticed. It is also the most likely to recur after surgery. Read more...

Is basal cell skin cancer dangerous? I’ve heard it doesn’t spread, so do I need to worry about getting it?

See below. Basal cell cancer almost never metastasizes, but untreated, will continue to grow. It is easily treated at an early stage, but if its growth involves vital structures, treatment can be disfiguring. In extreme cases, it can cause death. The moral of the story: as cancers go, it is not bad, but as for all cancers, it should be treated appropriately. Read more...
Not usually. Compared to melanoma it is not as dangerous of a skin cancer. It does need to be treated to prevent progression. It does have the possibility to spread, but not as common as melanoma. Read more...
Yes. Some folks choose to neglect basal cell carcinomas because they seldom spread to distant locations. Instead, give them the time and they destroy an eyeball or eat directly through the skull and into the brain. Please get yours taken care of. Read more...
No. People do not die from basal cell skin cancers. But delay in treatment allows it to destroy local tissues. You could lose your nose or your ear. You could get a giant ulcer. If you have a suspicious skin lesion see a dermatologist. Wear a hat and don't get burned when you are out in your yacht. Read more...

What causes pain in the muscle behind a (potential) basal cell skin cancer?

Inflammation. Inflammation is often the cause of pain. However, when associated with cancer, nerve involvement by tumor needs to be excluded. See your dermatologist. Read more...