Is stage 1 rectal cancer very serious?

It can be.. This is where the cancer does not go past the muscle layer. Surgery can cure this but there are risks. Surgery can be through the abdomen with or without surgery on the anus. The first way might need a temporary or permanent colostomy, an opening for expulsion of waste. The other way requires a permanent colostomy. Surgery may be done that just involves the anus, but that risks recurrence.
Yes. All colon and rectal cancers can be serious especially if not diagnosed or treated promptly, and good follow up is not maintained.

Related Questions

How common is stage 1 rectal cancer in women?

Low but rising. Rectal cancer rates are low in the young age groups but recent seer data analysis suggests that the rate of rectal cancer in people under 40 is rising. The recommendation for patients in the under 40 age group is to not ignore rectal bleeding or pain or change in bowel habits and to have a physician evaluate any such symptoms. Read more...
Common. Treatable by surgical resection. Often requires abdominal resection, but trananal excision used selectively. Read more...

Stage 1 rectal cancer 6 years ago- recurrence possible?

Yes. Recurrences are always possible, even up to 10 years out, but the majority of rectal cancers recur within 3-5 years. You should continue getting exams and colonoscopies, especially since you are young and healthy! Read more...
Yes but unlikely. In order to give a complete answer I would need much more information such as how was it treated. A major cancer operation including removal of lymph nodes or not, such as a transanal excision with no lymph nodes removed. In general however, we consider this cancer cured at the five year mark based upon research that shows there are very few recurrences after 5 years of follow up. Read more...

How does surgery for stage 1 rectal cancer work?

Through abdomen/anus. This is where the cancer does not go past the muscle layer. Surgery can cure this but there are risks. Surgery can be through the abdomen with or without surgery on the anus. The first way might need a temporary or permanent colostomy, an opening for expulsion of waste. The other way requires a permanent colostomy. Surgery may be done that just involves the anus, but that risks recurrence. Read more...
Removal of the tumor. If the rectal cancer is very small and near the anus, some specialized surgeons can remove the tumor through the anus with special instruments - this is unusual to do. Most will use open or laparoscopic surgery to remove the piece of colon containing the tumor and reconnect the colon to itself using stitches or staples. If the tumor is too close to the sphincter it may not be reconnected. Read more...

What CEA value conisdered a risk of rectal cancer stage 1 recurr. Preoper the value is 2.2 and since two years its arround. 7?

Be careful.. Do not put too much value on a blood test by itself. CEA of 3 or less is considered "normal". Smokers have higher CEAs; up to 5, maybe 10. Anything higher than that is suspicious but by no means diagnostic of recurrence. So called "tumor markers" sometimes go up in non malignant diseases or even for no detectable reason at all. Scans and sometimes biopsies are needed to confirm cancer. Best 2U! Read more...

Does stage 3 rectal cancer cause serious longterm effects on continence?

Depends. On how low in the rectum the cancer is and what modes of treatment are proposed or undertaken. If it is low it may indeed affect continence and a permanent colostomy may be indicated. Read more...
Not often. The cancer itself can invade the muscles of continence for really low rectal cancers that are near the anus. Many rectal cancers do not invade the sphincters. Surgery and the radiation that is recommended for stage 3 rectal cancer can contribute to incontinence but it is very difficult to predict and it is by no means a guarantee that incontinence will occur. Read more...

Stage 4 rectal cancer two spots in lung and one on ovary. What is survival rate, someone answer me honestly! Stop beating around the bush.?

Rectal cancer. There are many factors to consider to determine the prognosis of stage IV rectal cancer. The age at diagnosis, sex, race, grade of the tumor, known metastasis, and what form of surgery or other treatment has already been done all affect what the long-term prognosis is. Your best bet is to discuss your particular situation with your oncologist, who can give you the best advice. Good luck. Read more...

Stage 4 rectal cancer two spots in lung and one on ovary doc wants to do chemo why when I read survival rate is very low for stage 4 that has spread.

Quality of life. If what you are describing is the case, then you cannot expect a cure, but chemo may give you an extra year or two of reasonably good health. Is there something you want to do? If not, I'd be surprised and frankly disappointed. A frank discussion is in order with your physicians and those who love you. Then whatever decision you make will be the right one. Read more...