Can statins slow the progression of rheumatic mitral stenosis?

Maybe . Rheumatic heart disease is caused by a strep infection. The use of antibiotics has drastically reduced the incidence in the developed world. A study following patients over 8 yrs showed that in many patients statins slowed down the progression of aortic stenosis. It doesn't reverse or stop the disease. This is still controversial. And remember there are downsides to all medicines including statins.

Related Questions

Is mitral stenosis typically the result of rheumatic heart disease?

Can be. Rheumatic heart disease is pretty rare these days, due to aggressively treating strep throat with antibiotics. However, it is still the most common cause of mitral stenosis. In general, the causes of mitral stenosis include rheumatic fever, infective endocarditis and just the wear and tear of natural aging. Read more...
Yes. While many patients are unaware they have had rheumatic fever, it is the most common cause for mitral stenosis world wide. Read more...

What are the treatments for mitral stenosis?

Mitral stenosis. If severe, mitral stenosis is treated either with balloon valvuloplasty if the valve is not too calcified, or valve replacement. Read more...
Surgery. If it's causing symptoms, it requires intervention: either with a catheter (vavlulplasty) or with surgery (commissurotomy or valve replacement, depending on your age and the severity of the valve). Read more...

What valve narrowing results in mitral stenosis?

Mitral Valve. The mitral keeps oxygenated blood flowing in one direction from the left atrium to the left ventricle. Read more...
Mitral valve . The mitral valve is between the left atrium (la) and the left ventricle (lv). So blood with new oxygen returns from lungs into la then it passes thru the mitral valve into (lv) which pumps it to the body. Mitral stenosis is when the mitral valve doesn't open all the way. This makes filling of the heart difficult. The blood backs up causing the (la) to dilate and the lungs to get sick too. Read more...

How are tight mitral stenosis & severe mitral stenosis different?

Unsure. "tight" mitral stenosis is not an official medical term. Severe mitral stenosis, as one could imagine is a higher degree of obstruction at the valve with greater consequences on blood flow (cardiac output) and greater consequences on the lungs (buildup of fluid in the lungs.). Read more...

Can children have mitral stenosis, if so, does this mean it was genetic?

Yes. Children may have mitral stenosis. While it is known that there are genes responsible for the direction of cardiac development, mitral stenosis is not specifically linked to a genetic mutation in most cases. Read more...
Yes. Mitral stenosis in a newborn is one of the many congenital heart defects that are influenced by a complex interaction of various genes.It can occur separately or along with other defects. Affected individuals have a 5% risk of having a child or parent with some form of congenital heart defect, not necessarily the same one. Read more...

Can you tell me the pathophysiology and natural history of mitral stenosis?

Complex. Ultimately mitral stenosis would cause heart failure. The treatment is relief of the stenosis, either by mitral balloon valvuloplasty or mitral valve replacement. This is something that really needs a cardiologist. Read more...

Why does a patient with mitral stenosis lay on his left side during auscultation?

Better to hear. It positions the tip of the left ventricle closer to the chest wall so that thye stethoscope has a better chance of hearing the low pitched murmur. Read more...