What is the left ventricular assist device?

Booster pump. Instead of a totally artificial heart which replaces the entire heart, an lvad is a much smaller pump that boosts the pumping ability of the left ventricle (the main pumping chamber). This has many technical advantages over a totally artificial heart.
As the name implies. It is a device that assist the lv. It does so by relieving "work" or stress on the lv. The principle is for the blood going to the lv be diverted to a "pump" which then functions as a substitute lv to pump the blood back to circulate. Your natural lv then gets a rest as a substitute pump is doing the "work". The pump can be in or outside your body.

Related Questions

I want to know what's the left ventricular assist device?

Help the heart. Lvad - for end stage hf and bridging for heart transplant and at times as a last resort treatment for refractory hf treatment. Read more...

What is left ventricular assist device?

Device, propel blood. It is a device that propels blood thus taking over the function of the weak and failing left lower heart chamber. It is typically implanted in patients with severe class 4 heart failure who would otherwise have little mobility or not survive due to the failing heart. Read more...

What is an abdominal left ventricular assist device used for?

LVAD. Severe weakness of the heart muscle the assist device acts as a booster and can be used to bridge patients with severe heart failure to heart transplant or as a destination device if the patient is not a good candidate for transplant. Read more...
Same use for LVAD. . However, it is the location of the pump that makes it abdominal or chest. Read more...
Heart failure. Ventricular assist devices are used for end stage heart failure. They improve the quality of life and prolong survival. They are used as bridge to transplant or as destination therapy, in those who are not transplant candidates. Read more...

What is the use of a left ventricular assist device (lvad)?

Advanced CHF. Typically and lvad has been used in the setting of a patient with advanced congestive heart failure (CHF) where the patient is being listed for or is awaiting a heart transplantation. More recently, lvad's have been approved as destination therapy. On occasion we see patients who recover from their CHF through the use of an lvad, but that is not very common. There are multiple lvad types now. Read more...
End stage heart fail. Lvads are used for end stage heart failure either as bridge to transplant or as destination therapy for those who are not candidates for transplantation. Read more...
Heart pumps. Lvad (left ventricle assist device) are implanted pumps powered by an external battery that assist the left side of the heart to pump blood. It is implanted in patients with severe heart failure in whom medications alone are not enough ( such as our former vp dick cheney). Read more...

What is the typical survival of a patient with left ventricular assist device?

A few years. Much progress is happening in this area that enables improved longevity from a few months to possibly a few years --. Read more...
No typical. There is no 'typical survival' for an lvad patient. You live what you live. That said, heartmate ii receivers have been reported to have about 70% 2 year survival. Read more...

What does successful bridging with the implantable left ventricular assist device lead to?

Hopefully transplant. The device u speak of is also refered to as an lvad. The device serves as a 'bridge' to keep people stable while they wait for a donor heart to become available. Read more...
Keeps you alive. Bridging with a left ventricular assist device (lvad) implies that the device is intended to keep you alive until you get a heart transplant. It can also help control kidney failure and pulmonary hypertension that can develop from decompensated heart failure. Read more...

Is bridging to transplantation with a left ventricular assist device a risky procedure?

Depends. Like most of medicine and life, you have to balance relative risk vs absolute risk. The absolute risk of an lvad is high (stroke, infection, death) but if the heart is really failing and a donor cannot be found, the relative risk of not doing an lvad may be higher than putting one in. It all depends on the overall clinical circumstances. Read more...
The disease itself . Needs "a bridge" is risky enough. Procedures that help the disease have risk but certainly justify risk. It us not the risk itself that's an issue. Rather, it's the risk/benefit ratio. "the only thing to fear is fear itself". My hope and prayer for you is guidance to reach the best decision. Read more...