14 doctors weighed in:

For sleep apnea, why is cpap prescribed more than oral appliances?

14 doctors weighed in
Dr. John Feola
Internal Medicine
3 doctors agree

In brief: R/O OSA

cpap is more effective for osal.
Excess snoring/daytime sleepiness/apneic episodes/ aM headaches. And the Exam obesity/small oral airway/collar size>18. The definitive test is a PSG with split night/CPAP titration. I would request copy of sleep study and get a second opinion if you are not satisfied with the options. You are young CPAP can be difficult to tolerate. ENT FOR UPP

In brief: R/O OSA

cpap is more effective for osal.
Excess snoring/daytime sleepiness/apneic episodes/ aM headaches. And the Exam obesity/small oral airway/collar size>18. The definitive test is a PSG with split night/CPAP titration. I would request copy of sleep study and get a second opinion if you are not satisfied with the options. You are young CPAP can be difficult to tolerate. ENT FOR UPP
Dr. John Feola
Dr. John Feola
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Dr. Derrick Lonsdale
Preventive Medicine
3 doctors agree

In brief: Good question

Sleep apnea occurs because of "oxidative"not "oxygen" deficiency in brainstem where automatic breathing is controlled.
I.E. Oxygen has to be consumed to produce cellular energy. Vitamin b1 and magnesium are both vital in this process. So your question is very apt. See my blog "oxygen the spark of life that you can google.

In brief: Good question

Sleep apnea occurs because of "oxidative"not "oxygen" deficiency in brainstem where automatic breathing is controlled.
I.E. Oxygen has to be consumed to produce cellular energy. Vitamin b1 and magnesium are both vital in this process. So your question is very apt. See my blog "oxygen the spark of life that you can google.
Dr. Derrick Lonsdale
Dr. Derrick Lonsdale
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Dr. David Astrachan
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery
2 doctors agree

In brief: More effective

When controlling sleep apnea, cpap, if used properly, in almost all cases eliminates apneas.
This is regardless of airway issues and obstruction. The dental appliance can help, but in studies the appliance does not always eliminate apneas in all patients. In my patients i reserve the dental appliance and surgeries for patients who fail cpap.

In brief: More effective

When controlling sleep apnea, cpap, if used properly, in almost all cases eliminates apneas.
This is regardless of airway issues and obstruction. The dental appliance can help, but in studies the appliance does not always eliminate apneas in all patients. In my patients i reserve the dental appliance and surgeries for patients who fail cpap.
Dr. David Astrachan
Dr. David Astrachan
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Dr. Bernstein Joel
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery
2 doctors agree

In brief: Proof

I do not know of any carefully controlled study that suggests that CPAP or bipap is more often prescribed for sleep apnea.
The bottom line is that the most common organ that blocks the upper airway when you are paralyzed (asleep) is the base of the tongue. If an oral appliance (made by a dentist) is successful in bypassing that obstruction, then use it. If not, use cpap.

In brief: Proof

I do not know of any carefully controlled study that suggests that CPAP or bipap is more often prescribed for sleep apnea.
The bottom line is that the most common organ that blocks the upper airway when you are paralyzed (asleep) is the base of the tongue. If an oral appliance (made by a dentist) is successful in bypassing that obstruction, then use it. If not, use cpap.
Dr. Bernstein Joel
Dr. Bernstein Joel
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1 comment
Dr. Sal Aragona
Either incorrectly processed without a diagnosis by a certified sleep specialist or a limitation of your particular policy.
Dr. John McMahan
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Sleep Apnea

Most patients with sleep apnea have several options.
Medical management, devices such as CPAP or oral devices and surgery . Check out out website at www.Nwnasalsinus.Com.

In brief: Sleep Apnea

Most patients with sleep apnea have several options.
Medical management, devices such as CPAP or oral devices and surgery . Check out out website at www.Nwnasalsinus.Com.
Dr. John McMahan
Dr. John McMahan
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Dr. Sal Aragona
Dentistry
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Most effective

But compliance rate is poor, about 40 percent.
According to 2006 american academy of sleep medicine practice parameters, oral appliances are indicated for use in patients with mild or moderate obstructive sleep apnea who prefer them over CPAP and should be completed by a dentist with advanced training in sleep medicine.

In brief: Most effective

But compliance rate is poor, about 40 percent.
According to 2006 american academy of sleep medicine practice parameters, oral appliances are indicated for use in patients with mild or moderate obstructive sleep apnea who prefer them over CPAP and should be completed by a dentist with advanced training in sleep medicine.
Dr. Sal Aragona
Dr. Sal Aragona
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In brief: Insurance & success

The CPAP or one of its many varieties are the "gold standard" of care for sleep apnea.
Also, insurance companies are more apt to pay for CPAP machines than oral appliances. I don't feel that is right since oral mouthpieces are very successful for snoring and mild sleep apnea. Also, many people cannot tolerate wearing the cpap, but it is still prescribed first.

In brief: Insurance & success

The CPAP or one of its many varieties are the "gold standard" of care for sleep apnea.
Also, insurance companies are more apt to pay for CPAP machines than oral appliances. I don't feel that is right since oral mouthpieces are very successful for snoring and mild sleep apnea. Also, many people cannot tolerate wearing the cpap, but it is still prescribed first.
Dr. Jeffrey Bassman
Dr. Jeffrey Bassman
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