Must I have surgery to remove scar tissue from my breast implant?

Least of problems. As of now, women with implants are still "supposed" to be followed by the fda and their doctors for connective tissued disorders and autoimmune disorders also anaplastic lymphoma a rare ca. The least of the problems is scar tissue. Please refer to the fda website on their recent review. Unfortunately, breast implants are a very big and profitable industry--i hope they, and the docs step up.
Contracture. If you have capsular contracture then typically the treatment for this condition is surgery. There are some areas of the country were physical therapy has been employed with ultrasound to break up the capsular contracture however I do not know if there is a provider in your area. Speak to your local board certified plastic surgeon to discuss your options.
Not Necessarily. Removal of scar tissue from around breast implants (capsulectomy) is indicated only if the scar tissue has thickened causing the breast to be firm and/or painful. Otherwise, normal/soft breast implant capsule does not need to be addressed surgically. Your plastic surgeon will be your best resource when it comes to more precise advice. Best wishes.
Only if problematic. Scar tissue can usually be left alone if not problematic. Namely if it is not a capsular contracture. If it interferes with mammography or is symptomatic and causes pain or deformity, removal or treatment such as capsulotomy or a neo-pectoral pocket may be indicated or beneficial.
Depends. The degree of scarring determines the treatment required. Generally, if the scarring is causing pain or a change in shape, surgery is necessary to remove the scarring.

Related Questions

I had a breast implant surgery and a tummy tuck in 2008. Can I get pregnant with the implant and tummy tuck or should I get the implants removed before getting pregnant?

No. It is not necessary to remove the implants prior to getting pregnant. You should speak with your plastic surgeon to determine how the implants were placed (subpectoral or subcutaneous)). Read more...
Evaluate implants. Intact implants, saline or gel filled, will be fine during pregnancy as long as the gel implant is intact. If the patient has a capsule or hardening around a gel implant, it is important to assess whether there is an intracapsular or extracapsular rupture. Ruptured gel droplets can get in the mouth of the breast fed baby. Saline is not an apparent risk, intact or deflated. Implants risk infection. Read more...
No wait til after . I would not recommend moving implants before as long as you are happy with the current size. Expect that they will get larger with hormone stimulation and engorgement. It is common to experience ptosis (sagging) following cessation of lactation. At that poi t you should re-assess your shape size and goals and make a decision in consultation with a board certified plastic surgeon. Read more...

My second breast implant surgery also resulted in encapsulation. My doctor said that they had 'memory' and that it would most likely happen with a third operation. Is ittrue?

Not necessarily. While your risks for recurrent capsular contracture are increased, I do not believe that it is inevitable. Use of a new implant, in a new or pseudo-pectoral pocket along with the anecdotal use of Accolate (zafirlukast) therapy may help to lower recurrence rates. Altehrnatively, grafting with your own fat ai an option. Read more...
Yes and no... Capsular contracture is the most common issue with breast augmentation surgery. If you have had two prior events i would suggest you speak with a board certified plastic surgeon in your area about using acellular dermis during your next surgery to help prevent a recurrence. Good luck! dr k. Read more...
Higth risk. Regrettably, the rates for recurrent capsular contracture, once you have developed one which is sufficiently deforming to require surgery or cause asymmetry and discomfort, is almost 2x that of the original surgery. You may consider capsulectomy & explantation with staged augmentation, using new implants, placed in a neosubpectoral plane and/or strattice. Read more...
Capsular contracture. Capsular contractures are a difficult problems because of their tendency to come back. I routinely will perform a complete capsulectomy for first time capsular contracture patients. If they reoccur, i will in addition to performing a capsulectomy, insert a collagen matrix called strattice which is commonly used in breast reconstruction to decrease the chances of it coming back. Read more...