What dental devices are used to treat sleep apnea?

Apnea treatment. There are 2 dental devices that I am familiar with - a mandibular advancing device and a tongue repositioning device. There are multiple manufacturers for each device. They both work by repositioning your anatomy and increasing the space behind your tongue.
CPR or shackles? Having prescribed 100s of these appliances over the years, most work like CPR rescue breathing to hold the jaw (tongue) forward or to prevent it from going backward and by increasing the muscle tonicity in the soft palate. The tongue repositioners work by holding the tongue out of the mouth ("tongue bulb) or like a tongue depressor to compress the tongue--both increase the throat's airway size.
Sleep Apnea. There are various appliances. The pm positioner, tap-thorntontap-ist, silencer, ema, telescopic herbst, klearway. Someone trained would need to evaluate and you would need a sleep study be done at a sleep lab before the appliance could be made by the dentist in some states. Your medical doctor could order the study. Many patients can not tolerate the machine.
Many. There are 100's of different types of dental sa devices. What may work for one person, may not be indicated for another. You also must keep in mind that otc sa mouthpieces are risky because tmj/tmd issues can arise unless a custom mp is delivered by a trained dental specialist with years of dental sleep medicine. The dentist finds a few that he/she is comfortable with and has had success with.

Related Questions

What are the dangers in using a dental device to treat sleep apnea when a cpap is needed I was not allowed to sleep on my side during my sleep study. The results indicate only 3 hours of sleep all night and 0% rem. I feel the results may have been diffe

Did . Did you have a sleep study with cpap? If so what are the results? What CPAP setting was effective in eliminating your symptoms. Without seeing your sleep study and evaluating your airway it is difficult to determine if a dental appliance will adequately treat the osa.Dental appliances are use to treat obstructions at the level of the tongue. If you have a large apnea-hypopnea index (ahi) and CPAP is indicated then you may not get relief from the dental appliance because the appliance may not correct the problem at the site of your obstruction or the obstruct may be at a level that the appliance cannot affect. You need to discuss these issues with your sleep specialist, and have an evaluation by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon who treats sleep apnea. Read more...
Talk to your doctor. They may want you to try an at-home sleep study, which may not be as thorough, but may allow for deeper sleep and a more realistic diagnosis. This option allows many to be tested who are not comfortable in a sleep lab. Depending on your results, you may be a candidate for a dental appliance. Read more...
Depends. Any treatment with an oral devise or pap units must be titrated for maximum efficiency and then a post psg in determining the decrease in ahi value used to determine the particular level of osa. All psg testing is done supine to maintain consistency in test results and to determine the true value and effect of treatment with oral devises and/or pap units. Read more...

32yr old healthy M started bed wetting every other day this month. Diagnosed with sleep apnea last year and has been wearing dental device ever since.

Physical. Need full physical examination to determine cause of bed wetting. Report findings to both your general physician and the dentist who fabricated your dental appliance. If you have not seen an ENT, do so. Read more...

I want to find and naturally treat my moderate sleep apnea, I noticed that I have teeth impressions on my tongue. So seems like I have over-size ton?

Oral appliance. Ask your dentist if you would be a good candidate for an oral appliance to keep your tongue out of the way while you sleep. In past, we've suggested sewing a pocket in back of your PJs that's large enough to hold a tennis ball or equivalent in place. Hopefully that would be enough to keep you from sleeping on your back which is when most obstruction occurs although I don't recall seeing research. Read more...

Been suffering severe sleep apnea diagnosed at 17 but much longer than this. Feel deprivation and BAD effects daily. HATE CPAP. Can oral device help me?

Oral device CAN help. CPAP is the gold standard for OSA treatment because it is effective in almost every case. Oral devices are tolerated by some patients. The most likely candidates are non-obese patients with mild sleep apnea. Studies show some oral appliances reduce OSA severity by 50%, on average - patients with moderate to severe OSA may still have symptoms or remain at higher risk for heart disease, etc. Read more...

"my wife and I both have sleep apnea - we are on fixed income - what is the cheapest way to get a pair of those c-pap devices? "

? Health Insurance. If you have health insurance, they are covered. If you do not then a very good intervention is diet, exercise and weight loss. You need a prescription from a certified sleep specialist because of the need for proper fitting and monitoring. Read more...
Talk to DME. If you have insurance it might be easier to get them. If not, talk to the durable medical equipment (dme) companies in your area. They might be able to get you a deal, maybe a used machine. You will need a new mask. Your doctor's office might have some suggestions. Read more...
Don't skimp. I hate to say you get what you paid for, but..... I would check into insurance or a interest free finance plan like care credit. I would be careful, though, that you don't get such a cheap device that it leads to spending more money and doesn't function well. Depending on the severity of the sleep apnea, you could consider an oral mouthpiece. Read more...