Related Questions

What is the effect of HIV on a patient with myasthenia gravis?

Very unfortunate. Both can be rather bad diseases, and both would need specific treatments. The co-morbidities could adversely affect each other. And medications would need careful adjustments. Read more...

Why is ephedrine (ephedrine sulfate) given to patients with myasthenia gravis?

Not much data. there are anecdotal reports of ephedrine (ephedrine sulfate) increasing strength and endurance in patients with myasthenia gravis, but good randomized controlled trials have not been done. A Cochrane review done in 2014 did not recommend its use, and called for further study. Ephedrine (ephedrine sulfate) has MANY potential side effects - rapid heart rate, elevated blood pressure, even stroke. If this is you, talk to your neurologist. Read more...

Is an abnormal rns with a >12% decrement (not done on an area that is really weak) specific for myasthenia gravis? Please assume patient has signs and symptoms of generalized mg, as this is the case.

Maybe. An rns study is considered positive if the decrement is > 10% but a decremental response is not specific for myasthenia gravis. Decrements may be seen in other disorders of neuromuscular transmissions (lamber-eaton myasthenic syndrome, botulism) and motor neuron disease. Read more...
Not necessarily. Really require more than one area of decrement, and even so, nonspecific as can be seen with metabolic problems, muscle disease, neuropathies, and even can be artifactual. Maybe a tensilon test would be helpful, but of course, better approach via anti-neuromuscular junctional antibody or anti-musk results. In the end, if responding to mestinon, (pyridostigmine) may be a good confirmatory sign, also. Read more...

Why are thymectomies not done on patients with multiple sclerosis like with myasthenia gravis?

See answer below. Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder, driven by imbalances of immune cell subtypes that is distinctly different from that in ms. Removing the thymus in myasthenia gravis can reduce the number of immune cells in that disorder, and help reduce disease activity. The same would not be expected for ms. Read more...
Different diseases. Myasthenia gravis affects neuromuscular junction in the periphery and MS affects nerve coverings in the central nervous system. The immune process is completely different and distinct in each disorder. Read more...
Cause of autoimmune. Thymectomy has been shown to be a helpful treatment for some people with myasthenia gravis, but no other autoimmune diseases. This includes multiple sclerosis. In this case, the cause of the disease is not known to be linked to the action of B lymphocytes, which are modulated by cells that are produced by the thymus. Myasthenia is also linked to thymus hyperplasia and thymoma, MS is not. Read more...

Excessive and sour saliva with myasthenia gravis patient. What can cause it? And how to treat?

Saliva saliva saliva. It is not uncommon with mg that the cause for seemingly excessive saliva is actually related to incomplete or inadequate clearing of saliva which is likely because of the effects mg has on muscle function. Read more...

Cellcept (mycophenolate mofetil) for patients with antibody-negative myasthenia gravis; is it worth a trial?

Yes. It is not clear exactly how the autoantibodies work. Antibody identification may not be 100 % and there may be other antibodies that have not been detected. Depending on what therapy has been tried CellCept (mycophenolate mofetil) may be appropriate. This is best discussed with your physician. Read more...