Can you describe calcified coronary artery disease?

Calcified CAD. Plaque in coronary arteries is in a real sense abnormal tissue. Calcium tends to accumulate in abnormal tissues in our bodies. This phenomenon is called dystrophic calcification. The amount of coronary artery calcium as detected by specialized ct scans can be used as a predictor of future cardiac events such as heart attack.
Calcification . Of atherosclerotic plaques occurs over time. Soft or margarine-like plaques create inflammation which the body tries to "stabilize". One of the cells trying to stabilize these plaques is an osteoblast which calcifies these plaques.

Related Questions

What is coronary artery disease?

Atherosclerosis. Fatty plaque buildup in the walls of coronary arteries that result in decreased flow of blood to the muscle of your heart is coronary artery disease. Read more...
Atherosclerosis. CAD is atherosclerosis (known to start ~age 7), an accumulation of white blood cells in the walls of the heart arteries, with artery enlargement (protects blood flow for decades) ; subsequent plaque ruptures with debris+clots downstream + local clots which narrow artery opening producing permanent muscle damage, angina, progressive heart muscle weakness ; ?ing arrhythmias. Angio;stress tests miss. Read more...

Is coronary artery disease inherited?

Sort of. Yes it runs in families so if your parents have it you are more likely to also. This is partly because risk factors such as diabetes are also inherited. It is very complicated however, much more so than hair or eye color for instance because there are so many factors to consider. Read more...
Human Dominant . Atherosclerosis, an accumulation of white blood cells in the walls of arteries, typically starts in childhood & is primarily driven by lipoproteins (proteins which transport fat in the water outside cells) is dominant human behavior yet typically ignored for decades because it remains asymptomatic until plaque ruptures releases debris, triggers clots & suddenly block blood flow. Also other issues. Read more...

What is nonobstructive coronary artery disease?

Heart disease. Non obstructive implies that there are changes seen from cholesterol deposits in the arteries, however, not sufficient enough to require stenting. Take action in lowering cholesterol, blood pressure, stop smoking, control diabetes, exercise, lose weight, before it becomes obstructive. Read more...
Atherosclerosis. The vessel wall has "rust" on the wall but there is still flow. As it further builds up it can become obstructive. Read more...

What sort of disease is coronary artery disease?

Atherosclerosis. Atheromatous plaque formation due to cholestrol deposits is the commenst form of coronary artery disease. It can lead to heart attacks and death. Read more...
Serious. It means a progressive plaque development in the artery which will ultimately result in sudden obstruction of blood flow and a heart attack. Read more...
Artery blockage. Coronary arteries supply the heart with blood. Cholesterol plaques can build up and narrow the size of these. Angina is chest pain, fatigue or shortness of breath from too little blood flow. These plaques can also break off or allow blood clots to form that can cause total blockage, causing heart attack. Many ways to evaluate. Treat with meds and/or bypass surgery, angioplasty and/or stenting. Read more...

What are risk factors for coronary artery disease?

Several. There several risk factors (CRF) for coronary artery disease, some modifiable and some not. Non-modifiable crfs include family history (genetics), sex and age. Some modifiable crfs which can be treated with medications or lifestyle changes include smoking, hypertension, diabetes and cholesterol status, particularly LDL or "bad" cholesterol. Read more...
There are many. There are many risk factors - from gender (men are at higher risk when they are younger, but this changes with age) to other diseases (obesity and diabetes) to cholesterol levels to activity to smoking - and beyond. The best thing to do is to talk to your doctor about your health - what matters to one person may not matter to you! Read more...