What are the risks involved in congestive heart failure and pregnancy?

Multiple. If a person is predisposed to congestive heart failure, pregnancy can be tricky. Blood volume is increased in pregnancy, and this may not be tolerated by those with underlying heart disease. During labor, fluid shifts can occur with placental bleeding, IV meds/fluids, etc. And close observation is warranted. Some of the standard CHF meds can harm the fetus and may need to be stopped.
Rare. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare condition but serious . Avoid high blood pressure, reduce salt intake ANS see ur doctor regularly.

Related Questions

What are the risks of congestive heart failure in pregnancy?

Death, injury. Congestive heart failure is dangerous for anyone, but particularly for pregnant women. It can lead to maternal death, pregnancy complications (preterm labor, cesarean section, fetal distress) and need for intensive care. Management with maternal-fetal medicine and cardiology specialists is warranted. Read more...

What are the risks associated with congestive heart failure during pregnancy?

Decompensation. Pregnancy demands increased cardiac output and a failing heart may not be up to the task. Labor and delivery are physically stressful. Blood loss commonly results in anemia - both hard for a failing heart. The risk is that someone who is marginally compensated will become worse during gestation with progressive symptoms. If you're contemplating pregnancy, discuss it in advance with OB and cards. Read more...

What are the risks of becoming? Pregnant with moderate congestive heart failure?

Pregnancy. Your heart condition could worsen particularly if you gain a lot of weight and your blood pressure becomes elevated. You therefore require more than the usual care and your obstetrician may require close consultation with your cardiologist. Read more...

I'm apx 10 weeks pregnant and have congestive heart failure, buergers disease and a pacemaker. Is it possible to have a full term pregnancy?

Yes, but high risk. Due to these conditions, yours will be seen as high risk and ALL your Dr(s) - OBGYN, cardios, etc need to work together. QUIT SMOKING if you still do! The rare disease you name is even more rare in females so risks will be unknown but w/ good care and your full compliance it's probably possible - but prepared to have lots of help for perhaps a few years. Good luck! Best wishes. Read more...