9 doctors weighed in:
How many people have fibromyalgia in us?
9 doctors weighed in

Dr. Pierre Moeser
Internal Medicine - Rheumatology
5 doctors agree
In brief: Caution
Because fibromyalgia is a syndrome based on signs and symptoms with no known cause, it is difficult to be accurate.
We see a lot of over and under diagnosis. I have seen estimates anywhere from 6 to 18 million people with fms in the United States.

In brief: Caution
Because fibromyalgia is a syndrome based on signs and symptoms with no known cause, it is difficult to be accurate.
We see a lot of over and under diagnosis. I have seen estimates anywhere from 6 to 18 million people with fms in the United States.
Dr. Pierre Moeser
Dr. Pierre Moeser
Thank
Dr. Laurence Badgley
General Practice
2 doctors agree
In brief: 12 Million
4% of population.
Interestingly, incidence transcultural & across populations. This suggests fundamental human frailties that potentiate fibromyalgia. These data implicate common biomechanical injuries afflicting all humans, i.e., multiple childbirths & most common injury of humans - low back and pelvic girdle injuries and mundane mechanical back-pelvic injuries of lifting & pratfalls (shipman).

In brief: 12 Million
4% of population.
Interestingly, incidence transcultural & across populations. This suggests fundamental human frailties that potentiate fibromyalgia. These data implicate common biomechanical injuries afflicting all humans, i.e., multiple childbirths & most common injury of humans - low back and pelvic girdle injuries and mundane mechanical back-pelvic injuries of lifting & pratfalls (shipman).
Dr. Laurence Badgley
Dr. Laurence Badgley
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Laurence Badgley
The unifying genetic relationship in fibromyalgia is probably Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS), a known genetic condition.  I have noted that a good portion of female fibromyalgia sufferers satisfy the Bristol Criteria for JHS, and are able to oppose thumb to lateral radial skin, hyperextended elbows and knees, and can place their palms on the floor with knees locked.  Most could put their feet behind their head and back bridge as youngsters and many can do so as adults.  JHS is a disorder with a spectrum of penetrance; with Marfans and Ehlers-Danlos at the clinical severity end of the spectrum.  My speculation is that the trait is conserved in females because it increases pelvic joint (SIJ and symphysis pubis) flexibility during childbirth.  Many of my patients with fibromyalgia and subclinical JHS delivered their fourth or fifth child in minutes rather than hours.  I speculate that repetitive childbirth, in conjunction with the hormone Relaxin, progressively loosens pelvic ligaments.  This functionality would seem to favor infant survivability.  To my mind fibromyalgia results from the effects of a loose ligament-skeletal system attempting to maintain a medial center of gravity via chronic muscle spasm leading to widespread ischemic trigger points (after the work of Shah at NIH).
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