Is there anything I can do to prevent postpartum depression from coming back?

Good self care. There are things that you can do to help lower your risk of postpartum depression, but still no guarantees that you won't get it. If you do get ppd, seek early treatment as that's the best way to get better quickly. The good news is there's a good prognosis with treatment. Lower risk with a good support network & good self care, including good sleep, healthy eating, exercise, balanced lifestyle.
Build up awareness. Awareness of symptoms is one of steps of prevention. You know what you've experienced. While there're no crisis, it's better to start working on back up plan-- people you turn for help to, including mental health professionals; obstetrician, child's pediatrician. Create a "coping card" and once the baby is born a list of people who can help you with the baby and manage the stress. Good luck!

Related Questions

I sometimes get sad but is that enough to need to take estrogen to prevent postpartum depression?

No. Postpartum baby blues are common. They last only a few days and can cause crying, etc but should not lead to decreased appetite, etc. Postpartum depression is more serious and lingers. Estrogen is not used to treat postpartum depression. You need to talk to your doctor.
Have you considered. A short course of acupuncture? Have found this quite helpful for many of my patients.
Sad or depressed? It is unclear if you are having enough symptoms of depression to make it advisable to take measures (whether hormonal or prophylactic medication) to prevent postpartum depression. Getting sad periodically is normal, especially if there is a reason. In order to address this individually, see a mental health professional with expertise in perinatal issues.
Ppd. Sadness by itself is not indicative of major depression. If u r having other vegetative symptoms such as changes in energy/sleep/appetite, u need evaluated by a mental health doctor for further tx recommendations.

How can I prevent postpartum depression?

Have good support. The best way to prevent postpartum depression is to have an adequate support system in place to help you after the birth of your baby. Don't be afraid to ask for and accept help of any kind: from friends, relatives, and professionals if you need it. Try to avoid getting overly tired and doing everything yourself. If you've had depression before, watch for symptoms after giving birth.
Enlist help at home. Having help in caring for your baby will make things a lot easier. In the first few months after birth, your baby will be feeding very frequently around the clock and having some assistance in caring for your baby or even doing your normal chores around the house will make a world of difference! Don't get too hard on yourself and take time to rest. Also, talk to others about how you are feeling.
Good self care. There are things that you can do to help lower your risk of postpartum depression, but still no guarantees that you won't get it. If you do get ppd, seek early treatment as that's the best way to get better quickly. The good news is there's a good prognosis with treatment. Lower risk with a good support network & good self care, including good sleep, healthy eating, exercise, balanced lifestyle.
Ppd. Good pre-partum care, healthy life style, good support system.
Treat depression bef. If you are pregnant, the medications for mood are safer than the disorder. If you have a hx of pp depression the risk of recurrence is about 70%. Low dose sertraline at 25 mg starting even prior to delivery, and treating insomnia during pregnancy can be important. Don't get behind on treatment and don't be too conservative.
Medication. The best way to prevent post partum depression is to ensure you do not have depression prior to delivery. If you have had a diagnosis of depression, anxiety or post partum depression, your likelihood of relapse is over 70%. Sleep dysfunction is often the primary clue. Don't go into having new baby already exhausted. Low dose ssri can be helpful and the risk is minimal. Can start after del. To.
Support. Make sure you have plenty of support through out your pregnancy and make sure you talk to your ob/gyn openly about your concern regarding post partum depression. Engage in therapy or consider a psychiatric evaluation towards the end of your pregnancy so that your treatment could be started early if needed.
Build up awareness. Awareness of symptoms is one of steps of prevention. While there're no crisis, it's better to start working on back up plan-- people you turn to for help, including mental health professionals; obstetrician, child's pediatrician. Create a "coping card" and once the baby is born a list of people who can help you with the baby and manage the stress. Good luck!
Limit stress. GetHelp. ~20%of women who have babies get a signif depression/anxiety illness in pregnancy or within 1 year after birth. Monitor closely. Have an expert to go to if insomnia, anxiety, mood changes, changes in yourself develop, which usu start to occur in 3rd trimester...Catch it early! Find expert: www. Postpartum. Net or you may write me through healthtap with? 's or for help to locate specialist near you.
Get checked. If you think you could be having post-partum depression then you should get checked. It is even more important to get checked immediately if you are having thoughts of hurting yourself or others, especially your baby.
Why are you worried? If you have had a previous episode of depression, you might wish to talk to your psychiatrist about being on an antidepressant prior to delivery. This would mean minimal exposure to the fetus and could be started approximately one month to six weeks prior to delivery. Otherwise if you've never had depression, particularly postpartum depression, there should be no need for worry. If however you remain worried, then in your situation I would recommend psychotherapy as a way to ward off postpartum depression and I would start that prior to the delivery of your child.

Can taking Zoloft (sertraline) prevent postpartum depression?

Postpartum Depress. Zoloft (sertraline) can take care of postpartum depression. It is important to give meds. To a postpartum mother who suffers depression to prevent other problems.
It may! Any antidepressant has the possibility of preventing postpartum depression.

Should the Lexapro (escitalopram) have prevented me from experiencing postpartum depression this time?

No guarantee. Dosage and individual characteristics determine success. Talk to your doctor.
Dose dependent. Whether the med works depends on if it is right med for you, best dose, for the severity of current symptoms. If not helping ask doc if you need different dose or change of med.

Can postpartum depression be prevented if it occurred in previous pregnancy?

Build up awareness. Awareness of symptoms is one of steps of prevention. You know what you've experienced. While there're no crisis, it's better to start working on back up plan-- people you turn for help to, including mental health professionals; obstetrician, child's pediatrician. Create a "coping card" and once the baby is born a list of people who can help you with the baby and manage the stress. Good luck!
Good self care. There are things that you can do to help lower your risk of postpartum depression, but still no guarantees that you won't get it. If you do get ppd, seek early treatment as that's the best way to get better quickly. The good news is there's a good prognosis with treatment. Lower risk with a good support network & good self care, including good sleep, healthy eating, exercise, balanced lifestyle.

I had postpartum major depression after my first baby can it come back if I have a second baby?

Possible. Congratulations on being a mom. Yes, it is possible for postpartum depression to return with the second. Stick close to your docs. They are aware of your history and will do all they can to prevent or lessen symptoms. In the end all will be well.

What percent of women suffer form postpartum depression?

11-42% This is very common, with as many as 42% of moms experiencing ppd. The risk is higher if there is a personal or family history of ppd, depression, or anxiety.
Onset of PPD. Postpartum depression can present anytime in the first year. It is most common to begin within the first 3 to 4 months. However it can begin later in the first year, particularly with changes like abruptly stopping nursing, beginning of birth control pills, etc. If you suspect you may have ppd, contact your dr. And seek help from a mental health specialist with expertise in treating it.

What can I do to get over postpartum depression?

Getting over. Postpartum depression can have devastating consequences for both the mother and the newborn child. Make an appointment with your doctor as soon as possible.
Call your physician. Contact a mental health professional with specialization/expertise in assessment and treatment of postpartum depression. You can contact postpartum support, international at www. Postpartum. Net.

What can I do to feel better with postpartum depression?

An antidepressant. There is something called the postpartum blues which are common and usually resolves on its' own. Then there is post partum depression which can actually be quite serious. In fact, being overly depressed for too long after delivery can interfere with the way mothers and their newborns bond and attach to each other. It is important to seek out some treatment. Ask your obstetrician for help.
GetProfessional Help. Postpartum depression is common, but that doesn't make it trivial. For some, it can be extremely severe. For most, it interferes with both joy & relationships at a key time in the life of your family. For some, the negative mood can get locked in & be long-lasting. The depressed mom has a very hard time determining how bad it is. Plus there is often guilt that blocks a mom seeking help. Don't let it.
Postpartum depressio. Treatment with psychotherapy and/or medication is helpful.