What's postpartum depression vs psychosis?

Varies. First off, it's very important to distinguish if there is psychosis present without a clinical depression, a depressive episode without psychosis, or both. There are many treatment options including a wide array of medication and non-medication interventions. The top priority is to ensure the immediate safety of both the mother and child(ren).

Related Questions

How do people recover from postpartum depression / psychosis?

An antidepressant. There is something called the postpartum blues which are common and usually resolves on its' own. Then there is post partum depression which can actually be quite serious. In fact, being overly depressed for too long after delivery can interfere with the way mothers and their newborns bond and attach to each other. It is important to seek out some treatment. Ask your obstetrician for help. Read more...
Therapy & medication. Psychotherapy with a mental health professional with specialization in treatment of postpartum emotional disorders is very effective. Many women often need medication as well. With treatment, there is a very high success rate. Women with ppp need hospitalization and medication from a psychiatrist; this is critical. Read more...
DEPENDS. It really depends on whether it is depression or psychosis. Depression requires treatment maybe with meds maybe just therapy. Psychosis is extremely dangerous and requires medications and maybe hospitalization very serious condition and needs immediate attention.. Read more...

What's the difference between postpartum depression and psychosis?

Varies. First off, it's very important to distinguish if there is psychosis present without a clinical depression, a depressive episode without psychosis, or both. There are many treatment options including a wide array of medication and non-medication interventions. The top priority is to ensure the immediate safety of both the mother and child(ren). Read more...
Post-partum issues. Both are serious. Post-partum depression has sad mood & vegetative signs but no psychosis. Post-partum psychosis' onset is within the first 2 weeks after delivery, and as early as the first 48 to 72 hours (earlier than typical postpartum depression). There's often mania or a mixed state; restlessness, agitation, poor sleep, paranoia, delusions, disorganized thinking -- is a medical emergency. Read more...

What are the ways that people recover from postpartum depression/psychosis?

Absolutely. It usually takes medication if it was really psychotic. But unless you have an underlying mood or thought disorder that predated your pregnancy, you should be able to fully recover. Read more...

Could my wife have postpartum depression?

Find out via. Psychiatric evaluation. Possible sxs of post partum depression include feeling tired all the timethe woman might believe she is not a good mother which can lead to feeling guilty or inadequate. She may eat lot more or she may lose appetite ; weight (more than anticipated for shedding post baby pounds). She might want to sleep all day ; find it hard to get out of bed or she might have the opposite. Read more...
Possibly. Depression is not uncommon after childbirth, although mild "baby blues" are more common. Symptoms to look for include sadness/numbness, loss of interest in pleasurable activities, changes in sleep or appetite, guilt or worry, poor concentration, low energy, feeling heavy or slow. If she is making any statements about wanting to not be alive or harm herself or the baby bring her to an er. Read more...

What are the symptoms of postpartum depression?

Sad and tired. If you find yourself constantly exhausted, unable to sleep, sad at a time when you should be happy with your new baby, not interested in eating, having mood swings, worrying or thinking about harming your baby, you could have postpartum depression. This occurs in 10-20% of women within the first few months after birth. It's more likely if you've had depression before or are under stress. Read more...
Clinical Depression. The symptoms are the same as what is seen in what is known as clinical or major depression. These include depressed mood, changes in sleep and appetite, decreased interests in activities, feelings of guilt, and thoughts of death or suicide. Also, since depression arises after giving birth, there are frequent negative thoughts connected with the baby or the mother's ability to care for the baby. Read more...
Depression & anxiety. The symptoms can include: insomnia and sleep disturbances, sad & depressed mood, lack of appetite, worrying & severe anxiety, irritability and anger, panic attacks, feelings of hopelessness, loss of pleasure and motivation in usual activities, difficulty functioning as usual, overwhelmed and unable to cope with life's demands, and obsessive, distressing thoughts. Sometimes suicidal thoughts. Read more...
See below. Crying, feelings of guilt, overwhelmed.Postpartum depression significantly impairs functioning, onset might be delayed for up to a year. Even if hormones are stabilized and routine is there, sx do not resolve, worsen and functioning deteriorates. Untreated sx might lead to suicidal ideation/attempts and post-partum psychosis. Read more...
PPD. I answer as a reproductive psychiatrist: symptoms fluctuate: good/bad/good. Insomnia, changes in energy, mood, anxiety, arousal level, hope, coping ability. She will sometimes not feel like herself. If any of these are the case: seek help. Ppd harms the infant's brain development. Find specialist: www.Postpartum.Net. You may write to me via healthtap to get help finding a specialist near you. Read more...
Clinical Depression. In general, clinical depression is essentially the same regardless of when it occurs. The evaluation should be done by a psychiatrist, and treatment is generally the same as during other times. In my practice, I have prescribed traditional antidepressant medications with excellent results. Nursing while on the medications has not been a concern with my patients. Read more...
Get checked. If you think you could be having post-partum depression then you should get checked. It is even more important to get checked immediately if you are having thoughts of hurting yourself or others, especially your baby. Read more...
In addition to . Depression symptoms w' postpartum depression includes thoughts of harming the infant and/ or disinterest and difficulty bonding with the child. It is important to get help ASAP if you think you have postpartum depression. Read more...

What are the worst types of postpartum depression?

See below. The one that lead to inability to function, suicidal ideations and/or suicide. Thoughts of harm or actual harm to the baby and post-partum psychosis -- delusions, hallucinations that might lead to the acts of self-or other-harm. Read more...
Psychosis. If it gets too bad, with no sleep, the mind gets unhinged from reality. This is generally part of a bipolar spectrum issue but sleep is important to prevent psychosis. Read more...
Dangerous Ones. Postpartum depression, when severe, can be associated with sleep deprivation, suicidal thoughts, anxiety and intrusive, obsessive, and disturbing thoughts about the baby. Postpartum psychosis is a different condition that is more associated with bipolar disorder and involves hallucinations and delusions and an increased risk of infanticide. Both demand immediate support and psychiatric care. Read more...

What should you do if you have postpartum depression?

See a doctor. If you feel depressed in the immediate post partum you need to talk to your doctor about it, it is not normal part of the post partum. Read more...
Call your physician. Contact a mental health professional with specialization/expertise in assessment and treatment of postpartum depression. You can contact postpartum support, international at www.Postpartum.Net. Read more...
Ask your MD. Your OB is very likely familiar with this condition, and has a network of specialists to whom he will refer. Psychiatrists see and help many new mothers with pdd--about one out ten mothers experience it. Read more...
Get checked. If you think you could be having post-partum depression then you should get checked. It is even more important to get checked immediately if you are having thoughts of hurting yourself or others, especially your baby. Read more...
PPD Support. Talk to your ob. Reach out to a psychologist for an assessment and individualized treatment. Consult w/ psychiatrist regarding med options. Explore group therapy or meet ups. This can be in a formal setting like a postpartum support group or a less formal local mom meet up. One of the goals is to increase your support network and avoid taking on PPD alone. Read more...

Define postpartum depression and describe its causes?

Difficulty coping. Affecting about 10% of new moms, women with postpartum depression have strong feelings of sadness, anxiety, or despair that cause them difficulty coping with their daily tasks. It can occur anytime after delivery but usually starts 1-3 weeks after delivery. It is likely from body, mind and lifestyle factors combined. These women need treatment with counseling and sometimes medication. Read more...
Post-partum depressi. Is a form of mild to moderate depression that occurs within 1 month after delivery & can last up to 6 months. Usual causes are past history of depression, hormonal factors, genetic factors, complications during pregnancy, or social factors . Prognosis is good with treatment. Read more...

What are major risk factors for postpartum depression?

Past History. Far and away, the largest risk factor for post-partum depression is a prior personal history of a major depressive episode, major mood episode such as mania or bipolar disorder, or a prior psychotic episode. To a lesser extent, a family history of any of the above increases the risk. Read more...
Postpartum depressio. Risk factors are; history of depression, low self esteem, cigarette smoking, childcare stress, formula feeding instead of breast feeding, lack of social support, anxiety or depression during pregnancy, life stress, poor marital relationship, low socioeconomic status, single marital status, unplanned or unwanted pregnancy. Read more...