How successful is surgery for pelvic prolapse?

Very. Surgery for pelvic prolapse done by a well trained specialist has a high degree of success and a somewhat predictable rate of long term failure or recurrence. The key is good training and ongoing volume and surgery chosen that is applicable to the patient's specific prolapse problem(s).
High success. Surgery for pelvic support problems is always an individualized treatment, but overall the success rate today is better than 90% in most surgeons experience and the complication rate is low. Minimally invasive techniques make the surgery an even better option.

Related Questions

3 months post pelvic prolapse surgery. Went to pelvic pt yesterday. Staining today. Menopausal for 2 years. Is staining reason for concern?

Mesh? Prolapse surgery with some spotting after surgery? Hard to know so would suggest you check in with your prolapse surgeon. If you had a mesh reconstruction, you need to think about an extrusion of mesh vaginally. With uterine preservation, need to think about post-menopausal bleeding. Tough question with limited information....Sorry. Read more...
Pmp bleeding. You need a gyn checkup. Sounds like granulation tissue but more serious causes are possible. Read more...

Any tips for how to prepare for pelvic uterus prolapse surgery?

Basic measures. If you are a smoker, avoid smoking. If your prolapse is significant, your obgyn may choose to give you vaginal estrogen to rejuvenate the vaginal lining. Eat healthy, sleep well It's a fairly straightforward surgery in the right hands. Best Wishes and speedy recovery . Dr M. Read more...

What to do about pelvic uterus prolapse surgery? Advice?

Big subject. Please re-ask and be more specific about what you would like to know. For an in-depth discussion consider discussing with your medical provider or asking a provider on Healthtap Prime or Concierge. Read more...

Should pt/pelvic floor training always be tried before doing surgery for grade 2 prolapses and stress incontinence?

It can help. Pelvic floor exercises may improve your symptoms enough to where you can avoid surgery. You can also ask your doc to try a pessary as this is a non-surgical way to correct your prolapse and incontinence. However, surgery is usually the best when the above fails or if symptoms worsen. Find a good urogynecologist or a gyn with experience performing the newer procedures & good luck. Read more...
Pelvic floor. Many may suggest "pelvic floor therapy" for a variety of female urogenital problems, but in my opinion, it is unlikely to significantly improve moderate to severe stress incontinence or vaginal or uterine prolapse. Read more...
Probably. It makes most sense to exhaust all non-surgical options before resorting to surgery. Read more...
Not necessarily. Pelvic muscle training using biofeedback and electrical stimulation therapy can be a very effective treatment for incontinence. It is not likely to resolve your prolapse issues but may decrease the symptoms related to prolapse. The final decision to try this treatment should be based on your specific symptoms and a discussion of pros and cons with your surgeon. You may avoid surgery altogether. Read more...

I've had yeast infection after yeast infection after having pelvic prolapse surgery. I never had this issue before surgery. I need help!

Need a GYN evaluatn. If you have had your ovaries removed, then you may need some vaginal estrogen to balance out the ph in the vagina. Also, if you had any vaginal mesh placed, you should see your gyn to make sure that is is not exposed in the vagina. At the minimum, recurrent yeast infections can be treated with a weekly dose of a medicine called Diflucan (fluconazole) for four weeks. Read more...
Further eval. If you are having recurrent infections a detailed evaluation is indicated. It would be important to determine the type of yeast and make sure it is not a continuous undertreated infection versus a recurrent problem. Screening for diabetes may also be helpful. Use of oral medication may be necessary over a several week timeframe may be helpful. Read more...

1 week post pelvic prolapse surgery. No complication. Home with catheter, removed 2 days ago. Today dizzy 100 deg temp. Could this be due to surgery?

Could be Infection. Infection is a possible complication of any surgical procedure. One week out from surgery, it could be related. Or you may have developed a urinary tract infection due to the catheter. Either way, with a temperature of 100, it is a good idea to contact your doctor. I'm sure he or she would like to know about it so that they can ensure your best possible care. Read more...