6 doctors weighed in:
What's atherosclerosis from?
6 doctors weighed in

Dr. Jeffrey Indes
Surgery - Vascular
2 doctors agree
In brief: Multifactorial
Usually a combination of having a family history, diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, high cholesterol, smoking.
These are the main players.

In brief: Multifactorial
Usually a combination of having a family history, diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, high cholesterol, smoking.
These are the main players.
Dr. Jeffrey Indes
Dr. Jeffrey Indes
Thank
Dr. William Cromwell
Clinical Lipidology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Multiple Factors
Atherosclerosis, also known as “hardening of the arteries”, occurs when areas of the artery wall thicken in response to either increased modifiable (high LDL particle levels, smoking or high blood pressure )and non-modifiable (genetics, age, gender) risk factors.
Over time, areas of focal thickening may grow into a larger lesion called a “plaque" that can limit blood flow through the vessel.

In brief: Multiple Factors
Atherosclerosis, also known as “hardening of the arteries”, occurs when areas of the artery wall thicken in response to either increased modifiable (high LDL particle levels, smoking or high blood pressure )and non-modifiable (genetics, age, gender) risk factors.
Over time, areas of focal thickening may grow into a larger lesion called a “plaque" that can limit blood flow through the vessel.
Dr. William Cromwell
Dr. William Cromwell
Thank
Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
Preventive Medicine
In brief: White Blood Cells
Atherosclerosis is an accumulation of white blood cells, mostly macrophages (called monocytes, one of 5 white blood cell types), which have invaded into the walls of the blood vessel to remove low density lipoprotein (fat carrying protein) particles.
The macrophages may die if overwhelmed with LDL & cannot export the ingested fat into high density lipoprotein particles. Also high glucose, bp, etc.

In brief: White Blood Cells
Atherosclerosis is an accumulation of white blood cells, mostly macrophages (called monocytes, one of 5 white blood cell types), which have invaded into the walls of the blood vessel to remove low density lipoprotein (fat carrying protein) particles.
The macrophages may die if overwhelmed with LDL & cannot export the ingested fat into high density lipoprotein particles. Also high glucose, bp, etc.
Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
Keep in mind that atherosclerosis, per se, does not narrow arteries. Instead, arteries enlarge at all the locations at which plaque develops (nearly always on inside curves of all bends). I figured this our in 1985 because the data did not match the theory about narrowing & this finding was first published in 1987: See: goo.gl/aRhOU2 Narrowings are the result of wall tears over plaques & clots.
Read more answers from doctors