5 doctors weighed in:
What's artery disease?
5 doctors weighed in

Mazin Albert
General Practice
3 doctors agree
In brief: Artery Disease
Artery disease is the broad term for the disease of narrowing of the blood vessels caused by the buildup of plaque.
Most applied to the blood vessels that supply the heart, hence the term coronary artery disease (cad). It is assumed if you have narrowing of the vessels within the heart, then you have artery disease throughout your body. Artery disease is a risk factor for heart attacks and stroke.

In brief: Artery Disease
Artery disease is the broad term for the disease of narrowing of the blood vessels caused by the buildup of plaque.
Most applied to the blood vessels that supply the heart, hence the term coronary artery disease (cad). It is assumed if you have narrowing of the vessels within the heart, then you have artery disease throughout your body. Artery disease is a risk factor for heart attacks and stroke.
Mazin Albert
Mazin Albert
Answer assisted by Mazin Albert, Medical Student
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
Narrowing results from ruptures of atherosclerotic plaque releasing debris into blood stream & clots (both on the debris & over the rupture) which in turn block blood flow downstream &/or narrow the blood vessel at the rupture location. These ruptures & clots occur suddenly; the reason events are sudden (not slow); commonly partially dissolve but typically leave residual narrowed openings.
Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
Preventive Medicine
In brief: Atherosclerosis Key
The key issue: atherosclerosis, an accumulation of white blood cells in the walls of arteries, typically starts in childhood; primarily driven by lipoproteins (the proteins which transport fat in the water outside cells).
As the disease progresses, the artery walls thicken; expand (not narrow) thus Ds remains asymptomatic for decades. Plaque rupture releases debris&trigger clots block blood flow.

In brief: Atherosclerosis Key
The key issue: atherosclerosis, an accumulation of white blood cells in the walls of arteries, typically starts in childhood; primarily driven by lipoproteins (the proteins which transport fat in the water outside cells).
As the disease progresses, the artery walls thicken; expand (not narrow) thus Ds remains asymptomatic for decades. Plaque rupture releases debris&trigger clots block blood flow.
Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Board Certified, Neurology
48 years in practice
55M people helped
Continue
108,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors