Who is the most likely person to develop low back pain?

Any body with bad. Working habits.The risk of lower back pain is equal in every adult who overworks their body, regardless of age or color, and regardless of the fact that the person is a healthy man or woman. The people who are most likely to have lower back pain are those who have poor working conditions, like standing up for prolonged periods of time, sitting for hours together in front of a computer etc.
Overweight. Being overweight and also being in a job that require constant motion/twisting/bending at the waist, lifting heavy objects etc. Other times it can be as easy as tying your shoelaces or getting out of bed. Best bet is to eliminate or reduce the obvious issues like weight and overuse issues at work.

Related Questions

I've been having low back pain around the kidney area, but experiencing no other symptoms. Is it most likely just muscular?

Many possibilities. It could be muscular, but also could be coming from a kidney problem (stone, infection), or a problem in the back itself (disk, bone, joints). The severity and quality of the pain and other associated problems (numbness, tingling, weakness, blood in urine, etc) help doctors determine what are the possible causes and if tests are needed. If the pain is not improving, see your primary provider. Read more...
See PCP. Isolated lower back pain may have many causes. It is best to see your pcp to undergo an evaluation to determine the underlying cause of your pain. Read more...
Spine Pain Options. This chronic pain in the distribution as you suggested is the result of an irritated nerve or facet joints or other injury typically in the spine (low back) which are caused by herniated disks, spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease, etc requiring further evaluation by a spine specialist and may be candidate for facet injections/radiofrequency ablation and epidural steroid injection. Read more...

At 41, is it more likely to have prostatis or prostate cancer? I have the following symptoms: burn when urinating, low back pain, weak ejaculation

Prostatitis. Uncommon at your age to be diagnosed with prostate cancerbut not unheard of it occurring. Hope this helps. Read more...
Cancer unlikely. The symptoms you describe are not likely to be prostate cancer. You should see your physician or urologist for an evaluation, where a detailed history, physical exam, and a urinalysis with culture can be performed. Once a diagnosis is made, follow the treatment recommendations carefully. If it is an infection, a prostate cancer risk assessment can be made after treatment is complete. Read more...

What are the causes of bowel and bladder dysfunction in a person with low back pain?

Could be serious. Back pain with bowel or bladder dysfunction (i.e. Incontinence) could indicate a serious nerve impingement or compression of the nerves that leave the spinal column, or of the spinal column itself. This could be a serious condition and should be checked by your physician immediately. Read more...
See below. Bowel or bladder dysfunction is what we consider a red flag, meaning there is the potential for a serious problem in the spine. It can mean compression of the lower spinal cord or multiple nerves in the lumbar spine. It can be seen with very large disc herniations as well as some other conditions that can cause nerve compression. If you have these symptoms, you should see your doctor right away . Read more...
Various. My study of 20 young skateboarders with ibs & sacroiliac (sij) disorder found in all. Pelvic ligament laxity was diagnosed by occupational disabilities guidelines criteria. My theory is that sij subluxation irritates pelvic parasympathetics, stimulating both bladder and colon muscle stimulation. See complete discussion on my chronic pain board at quora.Com. Read more...

Does a person with low back pain usually see a orthopedic surgeon or a pain rehab doctor that treats back pain? How long does it take to get a referra

Low back pain. It depends on the severity of pain. Sudden pain with numbness or weakness or tingling in the legs that lasts for more than a week or gets worse would indicate a likely disc herniation. Your pcp should get an MRI prior to referring you to a specialist depending on the MRI findings. Gradual onset of pain might mean arthritis of he spine. Surgery should only be considered after all non surgical. Read more...
Is it inflammatory? Inflammatory back pain (ibp) is characterized by stiffness upon awakening, improvement with activity, awakening at night, prompt response to nsaids, and radiation to the buttocks. Ibp can signal the presence of spondyloarthritis, and should be evaluated by a rheumatologist. Pain that is worse with activity, improves with rest, and doesn't radiate is likely due to disc degeneration or overuse. Read more...
Either option . Your primary care doctor can help figure it out. Physiatrist are not surgeons thus their expertise is on conservative management. Orthopedic surgeons may also do conservative management but should definitely be seen if surgery might be a solution after conservative treatment fails. In some cases an inflammatory arthritis might be present, then a rheumatogist can help. Read more...
I would rec an ortho. Or spine surgeon b cn 1st. Then after proper work up, if he/she recs a pain management clinic, then b cn there. Read more...
Pain Doc 1st. Orthopedic surgeon is really only a good option if you think you need surgery or have real neurologic decline that again needs surgery. Most people that see orthopedic surgeon do not get surgery so if he's gonna send you to see a pain rehab guy anyway, why waste that visit? You should be able to see doc within a week. Read more...
Neither. 46 y fem w. chronic low back pain had medrol (methylprednisolone) & knees "click"; concern for hypermobile joints w. sacroiliac joint (SIJ) disorder & associated sciatica. Diagnosis made via specific hands-on physical exams. SIJ undetected by all imaging studies. Chiropractors overlook SIJ. Physiatrists oft neglect SIJ eval. Surgeons seek surgical material. P.T.'s discern but not allowed to diagnose. See an Osteopath. Read more...

Low back pain?

Strain. Could be strain, kidney stone, herniated disk among other reasons. See a doctor. Read more...
Back pain. The back pain can be caused by muscle strain, spinal stenosis, ruptured disc, nerve impingement ... If your back pain persists, i recommend you seeing a doctor for evaluation. Read more...
Need to be examined. Low back pain can be due to a number of underlying issues from muscle to discs to joints. Your dr can examine you and determine what is causing the pain and they may recommend medications, pt, x-ray, etc. Read more...
Several options. Back pain is usually related to arthritic changes to the spine. Sometime back pain can be related to infections, cancer, fractures, or even other organs such as the kidney, bladder, etc. If your pain lasts greater than 2 weeks I would see your physician. Read more...
Stretch/Rest. Rest, stretching, learning core strengthening exercises and using nsaids to help are the best ways to help back pain. Otherwise, if it persists see your doctor for other options. Read more...
Underlying cause. I am a functional movement specialist. Most cases I see are due to sitters disease or gait (ex; foot position). But you need to identify the origin and rule out more serious causes. Any neurologic issues like numbness in the legs, no muscle weakness, no fever, no urinary pain, fever, genital discharge, acute trauma, insect bites, etc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8TO8Il3vdxQ. Read more...
Low Back Pain. Most LBP is not serious and goes away with time, physio, and simple analgesia. Warning signs include numbness, weakness, urinary or defecating problems, or fever. If you are older or have a cancer that is concerning also. There could be abdominal causes or kidney problems also. If any concerns or symptoms persist you should see your doctor. Read more...
Low back pain. About 8 in 10 people have one or more bouts of low back pain. In most cases, it is not due to a serious disease or serious back problem, and the exact cause of the pain is not clear. The usual advice is to keep active and do normal activities and pain killers. In most cases, the pain disappears within six weeks. http://patient.info/health/nonspecific-lower-back-pain-in-adults. Read more...

I have a low back pain?

Low back pain. Is a common complaint. Most people in the world will experience low back pain at least once during their lives. The good news is that this condition is treatable if diagnosed properly. Back pain often develops without a specific cause. Rec.: see pain management specialist for further evaluation and treatment. Read more...
Depends.... Very general complaint and in fact #1 reason for disability worldwide is back pain. It is reassuring that most low back pain is not dangerous or serious. However, if accompanied by other symptoms such as leg pain or bowel/bladder changes or not going away after a few weeks of ice, heat, rest and anti-inflammatories you should see your doctor for a workup. Read more...
Several options. Back pain is usually related to arthritic changes to the spine. Sometime back pain can be related to infections, cancer, fractures, or even other organs such as the kidney, bladder, etc. If your pain lasts greater than 2 weeks I would see your physician. Read more...
Education/exam. Most cases I see are due to sitters disease or gait (ex; foot position). But you need to identify the origin and rule out more serious causes. Any neurologic issues like numbness in the legs, no muscle weakness, no fever, no urinary pain, fever, genital discharge, acute trauma, insect bites, etc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8TO8Il3vdxQ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t6SXiDCMP3E. Read more...
Low Back Pain. Most LBP is not serious and goes away with time, physio, and simple analgesia. Warning signs include numbness, weakness, urinary or defecating problems, or fever. If you are older or have a cancer that is concerning also. If any concerns or symptoms persist you should see your doctor. Read more...