Is aloe vera a treatment of multiple sclerosis (ms)?

No. It is not. I could not in my wildest dreams think of how a benefit could be obtained. However my medline search revealed no studies.
No real benefit. Aloe vera has no role whatsoever in ms therapy, but might be used for dermatological distress, which is a different issue, and no contra-indication to use in association with ms drugs.
No. It does not treat m? It can help the itching that can occur with ms, but not affect the disease itself. I can tell you that bad itching can be one of my symptoms at times.

Related Questions

How to cure multiple sclerosis ms?

NO cure. In medicine cure is not available for most common conditions control of symptoms and prevention of recurrence is possible in the majority of cases of ms. Read more...
Sorry. Cure not here yet. But if you have MS, use a potent disease modifying agent such as Tysabri (natalizumab) or Gilenya, as excellent disease control is possible. Read more...

I have all the symptoms of multiple sclerosis, but it didn't show up on the mri, could I still have ms? What else could it be? I'm negative for lupus

MS. Another exam which you didn't mention is a spinal tap looking for "oligoclonal bands." if this hasn't been done, it would be the next logical step even without MRI findings. Read more...
Spinal tap results. Spinal tap is definitive in about 90 per cent of cases especially if ms is located in the spinal cord and not in the brain. Read more...
Unlikely to be MS. Symptoms of neurological or emotional problems can be very nonspecific, and may be secondary to a host of other causes, rather than MS. Best approach is to see a primary care doctor, get a thorough physical exam with appropriate testing, and uncover the source of your impairments. This may be a simple issue to reverse. Read more...
Lots of things. Ruling MS in or out is much easier than it used to be, but it still requires training, skill & expertise that you'll never get from "Doctor Google." It isn't just laypeople who lack the knowledge & experience to distinguish MS from conditions that superficially resemble MS but aren't; the average US nonneurologist physician isn't confident of his/her ability to do so either. Read more...

Can you tell me about multiple sclerosis known as ms?

See below. Autoimmune type of attack on brain, spinal cord, and optic nerves in genetically susceptible young individuals, who are exposed to a variety of environmental events. Can lead to profound impairment and disability, but can be controlled and stabilized in most cases with modern potent meds. An expert neurologist who is experienced can work wonders. Read more...

Can you advise me on getting tested for MS (multiple sclerosis)?

Stepwise process. First, see an expert neurologist who has many MS pts, and do history and exam. If suspicious issues, MRI of brain, and a few blood tests will be ordered, and if inconclusive, MRI of neck, and/or spinal fluid study might be next. BUT, N.B., discuss with your primary doc value of initiating these complexities first. Read more...

What is the difference between md and MS multiple sclerosis?

Comments. Muscular dystrophy is a hereditary condition usually in young children causing weakness, scoliosis, cardiac problems due to muscular deterioration. MS is a non-genetic auto-immune disorder of brain, spinal cord and arms, which causes weakness due to effect on central nervous system connections. Read more...

Is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis a type of multiple sclerosis (ms)?

Not similar diseases. Als is very different, and is a disease of "mis-folded proteins" like alzheimers and parkinson's, and all of these affect older people. Ms is an autoimmune disease afflicting younger patients who have hereditary susceptibilities and environmental exposures. Ms can be successfully treated and controlled, but ALS does not respond well to current therapies. Read more...

What are the chances that a baby could get multiple sclerosis if one of the parents has ms?

Unlikely. Babies are not born with multiple sclerosis. Family studies have shown that relatives of people with MS have a greater risk for the disease than the general population, approximately 3->5 % in first degree relatives. Read more...
Fairly low. Although risk of first degree relatives passing on ms susceptibility runs btwn 15-35 times, the actual chance of mother to child is about 3-5 % and father to child lower at 1-2%. So unlikely that will occur in most cases, if one excludes environmental influences. Read more...

Optic neuritis (nmo) or multiple sclerosis (ms)? What are the different victims?

Explanation. It is not an either or, but rather a statistical risk. Optic neuritis can turn out to be clinically definite ms in about 20-50% of people. If there is more than one white matter lesion over the brain on an MRI in an optic neuritis patient, by 14 yrs later, about 80% have developed full blown ms. So, very high risk if one looks at the above statistics. Read more...
Say what??? This question is confusing! optic neuritis (abbreviated on) is one of many symptoms of ms and results from inflammation in one or both optic nerves. It is one of the most common symptoms of ms and typically causes eye pain and decreased vision in one eye. It does not typically cause complete blindness. Multiple sclerosis (ms) is an autoimmune disorder of the center nervous system. See below. Read more...

Is multiple sclerosis ever fatal? I’ve just been diagnosed with ms. My doctor says most people live normal lives, but what about those who don’t? Do some people die from it?

Strictly . Strictly speaking, no. On average, life expectancy of patients with ms is only about 5 years less than that of normal individuals. That said, there are rare cases of particularly aggressive ms, that can result in rapid accumulation of disability. It is extremely uncommon for ms to be fatal; rather, it is the infections or other complications related to ms disability, that can be fatal. Read more...
MOST WILL DO WELL. Most will be ok. Some people can have neurological coplications. Read more...
Do not worry. Multiple sclerosis is a treatable and controllable disorder, and typically, if treated appropriately, there is a normal lifespan. In this day and age, we have potent oral meds, and promising infusion agents, and more on the way. Work with a ms specialist, supplement vitamin d, take a potent disease modifying agent, and you should do very well indeed. Read more...