What are the necessities for someone with mild dementia in a nursing home?

See below. Some activities will depend on an overall physical health status as well: walking vs. Wheelchair; whether this person requires full assistance or partial. There are activities, e.g. Groups to stimulate brain activity, to preserve things that are still there for as along as possible; they still might go on trips to the community with the supervision; might receive individual or group psychotherapy.

Related Questions

I'm 3 mos s/p c6-7 acdfp. When can I return to work full-time as pt in nursing home? I do have to transfer and lift patients frail w/ and w/o dementia

Ask your doctors. The doctors who've been following your progress are much better equipped to answer your question than doctors who've never met you. Returning to work after such procedures depends on how you were before surgery, and how you're recovering. If you're working with a physical medicine ; rehab physician along with the surgeons who operated, those would be the ideal doctors to ask. Read more...

What if my mom has dementia and doesn't require nursing home care yet?

Have social services. Have social services in place, visiting nurse, support groups for caregivers, regular follow with your physician and family involvement. Read more...
Home health services. Ask your doctor about the type of care she needs at home. Patient safety is the top priority. Also home health services may be very helpful. Read more...
Educate and evaluate. Education about dementia is very important. The alzheimers association has a website www.Alz.Org that has helpful information and contacts. Specifically for home safety an occupational therapy evaluation with a tool such as the allen cognitive level test can be very helpful in ensuring your mom has the right help to be safe and have the least amount of stress possible. Read more...
Caregiver resources. In terms of resources for caregivers assisting with those with dementia, dr. Most compiled this list of resources with contributions from national and international neuropsychologists: http://cpancf.Com/pdf/dementia%20resources%20for%20caregivers.Pdf. Read more...

My 87 year old mom has dementia. They want to put feeding tube in because she is inspirating food. Lives in nursing home, doesn't talk. Should we?

Would she agreed? If her condition is such that you can give her good quality of live, then go ahead. If not, i would talk to sibling, family etc to make a decision to maybe not to be too invasive and let her be. It is a hard place to be in but if she would not have want it then many people would not do it. Read more...
Only you and your. Family can answer that question. It might be helpful to have a family meeting so that everyone has a chance to express their concerns/ideas. Read more...
Agree w/ Dr.Chastine. This is a very difficult decision and made more difficult by misinformation (feeding tubes prevent aspiration) and pressure family may feel from doctors and nurses. Often people who mean well, will try and pursuade you based on their biases and values. Decreased food intake is part of the progression of dementia. The best question is what would your mom have wanted if she knew this would happen? Read more...

When do you know its time for a dementia patient to go to a nursing home? Mother is 85 years old. Lives alone in apartment. Forgetful, but otherwise good health. Apartment is extremely clean and tidy, makes her own meals, walks independently. Siblings w

The . The basic reason for a person to live permanently at a nursing home is if they can not function without assistance. Can the person handle every day tasks of living such as brushing their teeth, washing themself, dressing themself? Does the person engage in unsafe behaviors such as forgetting to turn off the oven? Does the person have a medical condition that would make it unsafe to live alone such as falling often or seizures? Is the person depressed and isolating themself? I think that it is excellent that your mother continues to interact with others and that she maintains her own home and makes her own meals. Many elderly people who have difficulty with some of those activities of daily living, may still elect to live independently in their own home but might have some meals delivered or might have maid service. Sometimes relatives want their elders to be placed in nursing homes so that they will not worry about them. I think it is very important to ask the person what their desire is. Read more...
There . There are other social services related items you need to look into and they depend on availability and you and your mother's resources. For matters of impaired financial abilities of a person, services use can include bill paying services or from a legal perspective conservatorship, durable power of attorney, or a representative payee. For health related concerns, a visiting nurse, a pill dispensing system, telephone reminding system may help. For independent living issues, a home health aide and emergency call system are solutions before assisted living and nursing home living. For the most part, family decisions involving someone with dementia means the people who've been caring for such person are going through significant financial, economic, and emotional strain/burden/hardship assisting such loved one and social services are unable to keep up with the demands of such person with dementia. Read more...
She . She has supportive family and that is good. Since family members are visiting her daily, they will have an opportunity to recognize any changes in mother`s behaviors. Early recognition can lead to early intervention. If the family members feel that the mother is not able to care for herself anymore, that is the time for placement of your mother in a nursing home. Meanwhile, the family has to initiate a process to get a legal guardian appointed for dealing with matters like making decisions for medical care, management of finances and all other relevant matters. Your county office can provide information about how to initiate the process for appointment of legal guardian or whatever legal term they use in your state of residence. Read more...