What are the effects of atrial fibrillation?

See below. The most important effect of atrial fibrillation is the risk of clots arising in the atrium and causing a stroke when the clot leaves the atrium and lands in the brain. Patients with atrial fib may have decreased exercise tolerance and shortness of breath due exaggerated heart rate response. Patients may have fatigue due to decreased cardiac output. The feeling of palpitations may cause anxiety.
It Varies. It increases the risk of stroke, which can be disabling or fatal. Additionally, if the af causes a fast pulse for a prolonged period of time, this may lead to weakening of the heart and cause heart failure. As far as symptoms, it may cause palpitations, shortness of breath, chest pain, syncope, fatigue and sometimes none: some people are asymptomatic.

Related Questions

What meds can I use to control my a fib? What are the risks and side effects of medications to control my atrial fibrillation or to reduce the risk of stroke? What are the risks/benefits of other treatment options?

The . The treatment of atrial fibrillation has two important components: 1) treating the rhythm, and 2) preventing stroke. There are two strategies for treating the rhythm. The first is called the rate control strategy, and involves using medicines to prevent the heart rate from going too fast. These medicines do not prevent atrial fibrillation episodes, but are generally effective at preventing fast rhythms and also tend to have few side effects. This is a good strategy for people who do not have severe symptoms from atrial fibrillation, such as older less active people. The second strategy is called the rhythm control strategy, and involves using medications that are designed to maintain normal sinus rhythm and prevent episodes of atrial fibrillation. This strategy may be more desirable for people who are vey symptomatic when in atrial fibrillation such as young, active people. Unfortunately, this strategy tends to be less successful because recurrence of atrial fibrillation is common. The rhythm control medications also tend to have more side effects than the rate control medicines, and in some cases the side effects can be severe. Neither strategy is better than the other at preventing stroke. For stroke prevention, warfarin (also called coumadin) is typically used for people at moderate or high risk. This medication has been shown to be superior in preventing stroke, but it also increases the risk of dangerous bleeding because it is a blood thinner. Patients at lower risk for stroke may just take an Aspirin tablet daily. This has a lower bleeding risk than warfarin. Lastly, some people are candidates for surgical or catheter-based ablation procedures. These procedures can cure atrial fibrillation, but are not always successful and not all people are good candidates. Read more...
Many answers. There is no way to answer all these questions here. Beta blockers and calcium channel blockers will slow heart rate. Digoxin is frequently used for the same things. Discuss with your doctor if you have risk factors for stroke. If yes, blood thinners may be indicated. Read more...
Too Much. You're asking for the answers it takes me an hour-long office visit to answer for many people. Good questions all, but too much for a 400-character based website. May i suggest a visit with a cardiac electrophysiologist to discuss your particular situation? Read more...