12 doctors weighed in:

Is atherosclerosis hereditary?

12 doctors weighed in
Dr. Charles Jost
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
5 doctors agree

In brief: It can be

Yes, atherosclerosis, cholesterol and many other factors can be hereditary - there is a genetic factor - but that is not the end of the story.
Smoking, diabetes, overweight/obesity, diet, exercise, cholesterol control (i.e. The preceeding and medications) can influence the progress of atherosclerosis. 1st: know you numbers, 2nd: control the aforementioned factors and take your rx(s).

In brief: It can be

Yes, atherosclerosis, cholesterol and many other factors can be hereditary - there is a genetic factor - but that is not the end of the story.
Smoking, diabetes, overweight/obesity, diet, exercise, cholesterol control (i.e. The preceeding and medications) can influence the progress of atherosclerosis. 1st: know you numbers, 2nd: control the aforementioned factors and take your rx(s).
Dr. Charles Jost
Dr. Charles Jost
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Dr. William Cromwell
Clinical Lipidology
2 doctors agree

In brief: It Can Be

Atherosclerosis, also known as “hardening of the arteries”, occurs when areas of the artery wall thicken in response to either increased modifiable (high LDL particle levels, smoking or high blood pressure )and non-modifiable (genetics, age, gender) risk factors.
Examples of hereditary factors include inherited disorders of lipid metabolism, insulin resistance, and certain types of diabetes.

In brief: It Can Be

Atherosclerosis, also known as “hardening of the arteries”, occurs when areas of the artery wall thicken in response to either increased modifiable (high LDL particle levels, smoking or high blood pressure )and non-modifiable (genetics, age, gender) risk factors.
Examples of hereditary factors include inherited disorders of lipid metabolism, insulin resistance, and certain types of diabetes.
Dr. William Cromwell
Dr. William Cromwell
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Dr. Norman Chideckel
Surgery - Vascular

In brief: Atherosclerosis

yes

In brief: Atherosclerosis

yes
Dr. Norman Chideckel
Dr. Norman Chideckel
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Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
Preventive Medicine

In brief: Yes, dominant issue:

From autopsy studies, last ~7 decades, the disease starts ~age 7, is dominant human behavior, yet remains asymptomatic for decades: arteries expand in response to plaque (an accumulation of white blood cells in the walls).
The LDL & HDL lipoproteins (protein particles which carry all fat in the water outside cells) are the primary issue, not cholesterol (a fat molecule made by ever cell) per-se.

In brief: Yes, dominant issue:

From autopsy studies, last ~7 decades, the disease starts ~age 7, is dominant human behavior, yet remains asymptomatic for decades: arteries expand in response to plaque (an accumulation of white blood cells in the walls).
The LDL & HDL lipoproteins (protein particles which carry all fat in the water outside cells) are the primary issue, not cholesterol (a fat molecule made by ever cell) per-se.
Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
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2 comments
Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
Smoking, ↑ed blood glucose [carbohydrates=sugar] ↑ed insulin, glucagon [can stimulate gluconeogenesis even when glucose is elevated], obesity (↑ed stored fats) & various SNP (Single Nucleotide Pair) genetic variants,etc. can dramatically accelerate disease. As I have seen for years, Low-Fat-foods usually drive (liver converts sugars to fat for storage), Hi-Fat+Above-Ground-Veg. foods don't.
Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
Keep in mind that atherosclerosis, per se, does not narrow arteries. Instead, arteries enlarge at all the locations at which plaque develops (nearly always on inside curves of all bends). I figured this our in 1985 because the data did not match the theory & plaque not seen angiograms. This was first published 1987: See: goo.gl/aRhOU2 Narrowings are the result of wall tears over plaques & clots.
Dr. Bennett Werner
Internal Medicine - Cardiology

In brief: Yes

There is certainly a hereditary component but there are also acquired risks.
If your family history is bad, it need not be inevitable that you will inherit the disease if you: don't smoke, stay thin, exercise daily, eat healthily, and keep BP and cholesterol in check.

In brief: Yes

There is certainly a hereditary component but there are also acquired risks.
If your family history is bad, it need not be inevitable that you will inherit the disease if you: don't smoke, stay thin, exercise daily, eat healthily, and keep BP and cholesterol in check.
Dr. Bennett Werner
Dr. Bennett Werner
Thank
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