10 doctors weighed in:

Can eating hot food damage your gums and tongue?

10 doctors weighed in
Dr. Paul Grin
Pain Management
3 doctors agree

In brief: Definitely, yes

It's happened to the everyone at one time or another. If you burn your mouth on a hot beverage or food, the pain can be unpleasant.
When your mouth is burned by hot foods, blisters can form on your gums and your tongue, the roof of your mouth or the insides of your cheeks. Prevention is the best treatment. Good luck.

In brief: Definitely, yes

It's happened to the everyone at one time or another. If you burn your mouth on a hot beverage or food, the pain can be unpleasant.
When your mouth is burned by hot foods, blisters can form on your gums and your tongue, the roof of your mouth or the insides of your cheeks. Prevention is the best treatment. Good luck.
Dr. Paul Grin
Dr. Paul Grin
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2 doctors agree

In brief: Absolutely

Your gums, tongue and other oral tissues can be burned like any other soft tissue in your body.
Take great care when eating hot food, as the burns can be very painful and will make functioning very uncomfortable until they have healed.

In brief: Absolutely

Your gums, tongue and other oral tissues can be burned like any other soft tissue in your body.
Take great care when eating hot food, as the burns can be very painful and will make functioning very uncomfortable until they have healed.
Dr. I. Jay Freedman
Dr. I. Jay Freedman
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1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes

Hot foods can burn your gums and tounge.
The damage is not permanent it will heal just like any other burn.

In brief: Yes

Hot foods can burn your gums and tounge.
The damage is not permanent it will heal just like any other burn.
Dr. William Ledford
Dr. William Ledford
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Dr. Susan Wingo
Internal Medicine - Endocrinology

In brief: Yes

These tissues do not have a protective layer of dead cells like the skin on the outside of the body.
So these tissues are more easily burned than skin and can blister or develop open sores. If you're unsure of the food temperature, take a very small bite or sip, and if it's uncomfortable in your mouth, wait a few minutes to let it cool down.

In brief: Yes

These tissues do not have a protective layer of dead cells like the skin on the outside of the body.
So these tissues are more easily burned than skin and can blister or develop open sores. If you're unsure of the food temperature, take a very small bite or sip, and if it's uncomfortable in your mouth, wait a few minutes to let it cool down.
Dr. Susan Wingo
Dr. Susan Wingo
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