What type of anesthesia is done for shoulder arthroscopy?

General or regional. Shoulder arthroscopy may be done under general anesthesia, meaning that you would be completely asleep. It can also be done with nerve block (interscalene), where local anesthesia numbs the shoulder and sedation is given to help the patient relax and doze off during the procedure. Both are safe in experienced hands, but have different risks and benefits. Discuss with your anesthesiologist.
Usually general. Usually general in my community. Houston, tx.
Combination. The usual anesthesia for this procedure is a general. This can be supplemented by a regional block to the shoulder if the procedure indicates this.

Related Questions

Undergoing a key hole surgery (shoulder arthroscopy) so what anestheisa?

Depends. Typically i recommend combination of general anesthesia with a regional block (inter scalene of supraclaviclar). Blocks do have risks, and these should be discussed with your anesthesiologist. However, there is very good evidence showing use of pre-op block lessens post-op pain. Read more...
Depends. Each surgeon and facility have their own preferred method of anesthesia. We utilize a brachial plexus block placed with ultrasound which is then supplemented with a light general anesthetic. This really helps patients with pain control for the first 2-3 days following surgery. Read more...
Combined. Usually a block to numb the arm and general anesthesia to protect your breathing. Read more...
See below. This is usually done under general anesthesia, with the possibility of a regional block to assist with post-operative pain. Read more...

I'm getting a key hole surgery (shoulder arthroscopy) this saturday. Very scared of anestheisa.?

From experience. The best anesthesia 4 shoulder is a scalene nerve block ; sedation with drugs that do not put u to sleep, but they with pain medication given keep u unaware of anything going on, ; last 8-12 hrs or more. Read more...

I'm getting a key hole surgery (shoulder arthroscopy) this saturday. I'm very scared of anestheisa. Can it hurt me?

Unlikely! For an otherwise healthy person, anesthesia is very low risk due to excellent monitors and safe drugs. Talk to your anesthesiologist about the type of anesthesia that is planned. This could be general anesthesia, or a nerve block. Just be sure not to eat or drink after midnight. Arthroscopy is well tolerated by most people. Best of luck! Read more...

How do I know if my injury really warrants a shoulder arthroscopy?

Pain doesn't improve. A full thickness rotator cuff tear requires arthroscopic repair. Any other injury should be treated non-operative initially. Physical therapy, nsaid's and oral/injectable steroids are standard treatments. If these measures fail, shoulder arthroscopy is the next step. Make sure your orthopaedic surgeon is board certified. Read more...
Depends. It really depends on the exact diagnosis and prognosis. If you have any hesitation regarding a recommendation we always recommend getting a second opinion with a shoulder specialist. Learn more here: http://www.Theshouldercenter.Com/shoulder-specialist.Htm. Read more...

What kinds of doctors perform a shoulder arthroscopy?

Orthopaedic surgeons. Orthopaedic surgeons treat a variety of musculoskeletal conditions. When the shoulder is affected, arthroscopy is a common operative solution. Physical therapy, nsaid's, and oral/injectable steroids are the initial treatments for many shoulder problems. If non-operative management fails, arthroscopic surgery is the next step. May sure your orthopaedic surgeon is board certified. Read more...
Orthopedic Surgeon. Orthopedic surgeons perform shoulder arthroscopy along with surgical repair. Many surgeons perform shoulder arthroscopy but only a few surgeons focus only on shoulder surgery. Depending on the nature and complexity of your problem you may consider seeing a shoulder specialist: http://www.Theshouldercenter.Com/shoulder-specialist.Htm. Read more...

What is the suturing technique used for shoulder arthroscopy?

Knots vs knot-less. To fix a rotator cuff tear arthroscopically, you have to do 3 things. 1: identify the torn cuff. 2: mobilize the torn cuff toinge bone. 3: secure the torn tendon to the bone. Arthroscopic suture techniques are used to complete part 3. Suture, with or with-out an anchor, is placed into the rotator cuff. Sometimes the sutures are tied to a bone anchor (knot) or impacted into bone (knot-less). Read more...
Highly Variable. It depends significantly on the type of surgery performed (rotator cuff, labrum, etc.) and also the skill and experience of the surgeon. Many surgeons use knotless devices where no knot tying is required, however, i recommend you seek out a shoulder specialist that ties knots for everything as the results are much better. Learn more here: http://www.Theshouldercenter.Com/shoulderpain/2010/shoulde. Read more...