What are the symptoms of baby bottle tooth decay?

Cavities, which can. Cavities seen by the parent, caused by the lactose in milk (milk sugar).
Cavities . Baby-bottle decay is usually found on a child's anterior or front teeth. These teeth have decay caused from the milk or juice that is placed in the child's bottle and typically given to them as they sleep. Other teeth can have decay as well.
Early- white spots. Baby bottle tooth decay is now called early childhood caries, since a child doesn't need to be using a bottle to have it. The earliest signs are white spots on the teeth- the result of acid demineralization. As the demineralization process continues, the teeth can become dark, the result of decayed dentin under the enamel, and finally the weak enamel breaks and makes a hole- a "cavity".
Germs + milk sugar. Streptococcus mutans is the predominant germ in the mouths of infants developing early childhood decay.The sugar in babies diet lingers around the teeth & feeds the germ.As the germ breaks down the sugar, an acid is formed that dissolves the enamel & produces whitish & brownish scooped out areas in the teeth.The front teeth are affected > back early on.
Baby Bottle Decay. The cardinal sign of baby bottle decay is rampant decay over the incisor area of a child's dentition. The reason why this is allow to happen is because nobody is watching. If parent are brushing and flossing their child's teeth every night and every morning, baby bottle caries would be non-existent. It is not like the dirty diaper that screams to be changed. A parent's daily watchful eye is needed.
Tooth decay. Usually it starts with a "white spot lesion" forming on the upper front teeth at the gum line. It rapidly progresses to brownish pitting and eventually holes in these same areas. From there it progresses to the back teeth and it starts to destroy them as well. The child will often not complain of pain. The teeth hurt, they are just so used to it they don't complain.

Related Questions

What is baby bottle tooth decay?

Leaching of enamel. Babies who fall asleep at the bottle or breast or babies who constantly have a bottle in their mouths with formula, juice or milk may end up with extensive decay of their baby teeth. The acid in these fluids may dissolve the enamel of the teeth. Read more...
Enamel loss. When a baby bottle feeds, the suction bathes the front of the mouth & teeth with sugar which germs on the teeth eat and break down to an acid that will dissolve the enamel. A water rince after feeds helps reduce the effect, and moving to a sippy cup bypasses the teeth(as long as it is a hard spout, not the soft rubbery ones). Letting a baby lay down with a bottle is an invitation to decay. Read more...
Front teeth cavities. Cavities form on teeth when the outer enamel is damaged by acids from bacteria or acids in the food or drink. After the enamel is damaged, a cavity reaches the inner part of the tooth, which is not as tough. Then, the tooth dissolves away more easily. Let babies use bottles only during meals or snacks, and don't let any child walk around with a drink (minimize teeth's contact with food/drink). Read more...
Baby Bottle Decay. The cardinal sign of baby bottle decay is rampant decay over the incisor area of a child's dentition. The reason why this is allow to happen is because nobody is watching. If parent are brushing and flossing their child's teeth every night and every morning, baby bottle caries would be non-existent. It is not like the dirty diaper that screams to be changed. A parent's daily watchful eye is needed. Read more...
Severe early decay. More correctly know as early childhood caries, it is one of the most emotionally and physically devastating oral diseases. It causes severe, rapid decay of an infant's teeth. Often the 4 upper front teeth may need to be extracted by age two and pulpotomies (baby root canals) and stainless steel crowns placed on the back teeth. The good news is it is 100% preventable with proper infant care. Read more...
Decay from milk. Children do not swallow the last sip of milk from the bottle as they fall asleep. This milk pools in their mouth and provide nutrients to the bacteria normally found in the mouth. The metabolic acids created by the bacterial demineralize the teeth and create massive amounts of decay. Giving the baby a sip of water before falling asleep may dilute the milk and minimize the risks. Read more...

How typical is baby bottle tooth decay?

Baby bottle decay. I see it about 1 in 100 children. Parents need to brush and floss the child's teeth as soon as they come in! the diet is very important! refined carborhydrates like crackers, chips, juice boxes (which are full of sugar) are a no no. If your child needs the bottle at night - make sure it is only water- milk has sugar in and can cause decay sitting on the teeth overnight. Read more...
Depends. Baby bottle decay is prominent enough that precautions should be taken to avoid it. No juices through the bottle, no going to sleep with bottle in mouth, swab teeth and mouth with gauze early on. Read more...
It depends sadly. Often on socio-economic parameters. In my 23 years of practice I have seen maybe less than 5 cases and those too nothing like the pictures that we saw in dental school. There are other areas that the incidence is much higher sadly. It is something that is totally preventable. Hope this helps. Read more...
Fairly uncommon. Fortunately pediatricians are well aware of this problem and know to address it before it happens. Unusual to see baby bottle syndrome today, but if present is deviating. Never put child to sleep with bottle containing anything other than water. If child nurses/drinks just before being put down teeth should be wiped clean. See dentist or pediatric dental specialist at 1st, b'day, no later. Read more...
Rare. Now with the raised dental awareness , baby bottle syndrome is nor as prevalent as it was back in the days.. Read more...

Is baby bottle tooth decay a real thing?

Bottle mouth. This is a real(and devastating) condition.It is caused by sugars in the liquid(milk, formula, juice) .When a child is put to bed with a bottle the teeth are bathed in the sugar causing decay, to prevent this do not let the child have a bottle in the crib to fall asleep with or if you must only put water in the bottle. Read more...
Yes . Baby bottle decay is real, and is rampant in some communities. By allowing the child to sleep with sweetened water, milk or juice for hours can cause a rapid onset of cavities. Read more...
YES. More correctly know as early childhood caries, it is one of the most emotionally and physically devastating oral diseases. It causes severe, rapid decay of an infant's teeth. Often the 4 upper front teeth may need to be extracted by age two and pulpotomies (baby root canals) and stainless steel crowns placed on the back teeth. The good news is it is 100% preventable with proper infant care. Read more...
Very real . Usually it starts with a "white spot lesion" forming on the upper front teeth at the gum line. It rapidly progresses to brownish pitting and eventually holes in these same areas. From there it progresses to the back teeth and it starts to destroy them as well. The child will often not complain of pain. The teeth hurt, they are just so used to it they don't complain. Read more...

When can baby bottle tooth decay start?

As soon. As the baby has his/her first tooth so start to clean the teeth as soon as they appear. Do not put your baby down with a bottle filled with anything other than water as milk or other sugared liquids will bath the teeth in fuel for the bacteria that causes decay. Please brush and floss those baby teeth and make it a fun game(chase the sugar bugs). Let your child chew on a secured TB as a pacifier. Read more...
When teeth appear. As soon as your child starts to develop teeth around 6-7 months you must be careful that you do not allow your child to sleep with a bottle containing sugary substances including milk or fruit juices. Read more...
If there is a tooth. If there is a tooth their is a risk. Risk of decay is related to exposure to sugars (ie milk, juice, etc...) and time. So for example, the longer they have the bottle, like night time sleeping, the more risk of decay. Hope that helps. - dr. Jonathan neman. Read more...
Immediately . Baby bottle decay can start with the presence of food and teeth. If the babies teeth are not cleaned after each feeding, and the food is able to either pool or accumulate, you can be sure that decay will start to occur. It is best to start a routine of cleaning the food and drink from the child's mouth after each feeding to get them into the routine of good oral hygiene from an early age. Read more...
Establish a . consistent bedtime with a routine of reading, rocking, feeding & wiping out your baby''s mouth before putting her in her crib drowsy but awake by 4 mos. to avoid dental caries in erupting teeth at 5-6 months when procedural memory & learned behaviors begin. Sipping milk or juice from a bottle or Sippee cup ad lib is also a risk for tooth decay. Begin an open-mouth cup at the table at 11 mos. Read more...

How do you treat baby bottle tooth decay?

Prevention & dentist. First - go see a pediatric or your general dentist asap. Next prevent future decay by never putting a baby to bed with a bottle of milk, formula or juice. If you must put a baby down with a bottle it can only be water. In addition to tooth decay, this is the beginning of the path toward obesity and diabetes. Read more...
Clean the teeth. If caught early enough, the tooth decay process can be stopped and even repaired. Brush teeth thoroughly at least once a day to remove acid causing bacteria, stay away from sugars, breads and sodas (even diet!), use a small amount of Fluoride ( in toothpaste and water) to help calcium and phosphate in the saliva to repair the acid damage. Read more...
Xylitol. Prevention is most important. In addition to brushing the baby teeth and no bottle in the bed, you can use xylitol to prevent decay. Xylitol is a natural sugar available in granular form, mints, chewies or gum. It inhibits the bacteria that causes decay from growing. Read more...
Depends on severity. If mild it can be treated preventively by changing bottle habits, improving diet and oral hygeine practices and home applications of topical fluoride. If more severe then dental restorations and possible tooth extraction may be required in addition to preventive measures. Long term ongoing dental care will be needed. These children are much more susceptible to additional cavities later in life. Read more...
That depends. Baby bottle tooth decay is an emotionally and physically devastating disease. Very often by the time we see the child for the first time the front teeth are so destroyed that they do need to be extracted. We can usually save the back teeth with stainless steel crowns. These children are also more prone to future cavities and need constant follow up dental care. Read more...

Describe the features of baby bottle tooth decay.?

Sugar+germs=erosion. When babies bottle feed, suction keeps a pool of their feed (formula or juice) on the front teeth.Germs in the mouth, live off nutrients in salava & formula/breast milk/juice.As the germs break down the sugars they form acid which dissolves the enamel in the teeth. Babies that sleep with a bottle or cary one all day are distroying their teeth.Caps are often used to protect remnants & hold spaces. Read more...
Early- white spots. Baby bottle tooth decay is more accurately referred to as early childhood caries since children don’t need to be using a bottle to develop tooth decay. The very earliest stages of ecc can appear as white spots on the teeth- often by the gumline. This is demineralized dental enamel. If the demineralization continues under the enamel, the spot will become darker. The enamel can appear intact. Read more...
Baby Bottle Decay. The cardinal sign of baby bottle decay is rampant decay over the incisor area of a child's dentition. The reason why this is allow to happen is because nobody is watching. If parent are brushing and flossing their child's teeth every night and every morning, baby bottle caries would be non-existent. It is not like the dirty diaper that screams to be changed. A parent's daily watchful eye is needed. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: Baby bottle tooth decay?

Baby Bottle Syndrome. Circumferential decay of deciduous teeth, most commonly incisors, usually in the gingival 1/3 of the crowns, Caused by putting child down to nap or sleep with a bottle containing milk or juice. Sugars in the liquids lay on the teeth, combine with bacteria (plaque) to form decay producing acids. Read more...
Definition. tooth decay by exposure to milk when baby sleeps with bottle in mouth. Can occur with or without dental pain. Read more...

How long does tooth decay associated with baby bottle tooth decay last?

Until treated. Baby bottle tooth decay is a serious condition that is caused by putting a child to bed with juice, milk or another sugary drink in their bottle. The liquid accumulates around the upper front teeth and causes decay to occur rapidly. Decay removal and placement of tooth colored fillings or crowns is indicated if the teeth can be salvaged. If not, they will need to be extracted. See a dentist asap! Read more...
Until it is removed. Your question suggests that you think decay can disappear on its own if the condition that caused it is stopped. Unfortunately that is not the case. Once the condition exists treatment is required. Decay is a bacterial infection and can lead to more serious problems. Step 1-stop the cause by changing the content of the bottle at bedtime, step 2-take your child to the dentist to treat the condition. Read more...
Baby bottle decay. If you have stopped the use of juices and milk in the baby bottle to put the child to sleep and you have had all the previously effected teeth restored. It should have controlled the decay. You will always be more susceptible to decay until the baby teeth are lost. Read more...

How common is baby bottle tooth decay in infants?

Depends on diet. Much of baby bottle decay is dependent on diet. Sending the child to bed with a bottle full of juice or milk (anything other than water) or not brushing baby's teeth can make them more susceptible to baby bottle decay. This is usually seen as decay starting on the front teeth and working its way back. Read more...
It depends. Baby bottle tooth decay is not too common and it depends on how often the baby falls asleep with the bottle in the mouth and keeps sucking on the milk throughout the night. It is best to remove the bottle once baby is asleep, and replace the bottle with pure water. Everyday wipe the teeth with a wet or dry gauze to remove the layer of plaque. Read more...
Bottle Tooth Decay. Baby bottle tooth decay is common in the lower socioeconomic groups of society who lack education. Allowing infants to feed during sleep using a bottle or the breast will cause this condition. You can teach your child to fall sleep without the breast or the bottle, or with a bottle filled with water. Always brush their teeth before bed, even if they resisit. They will learn to like it in time. Read more...
It depends. Economically disadvantaged areas tend to have high incidence of baby bottle decay then more well to do areas. It will occur anytime a child is put to sleep on a regular basis with a bottle of anything other then water. It is 100% preventible with proper infant oral hygeine. Bringing your child to the pediatric dentist once they get their first tooth will educate you on proper infant oral hygeine. Read more...