What are the symptoms involved with a phantom limb?

Sensation. Phantom limb symptoms are that the limb is still there even after an amputation. Phantom pain is pain in the limb even if it is not there.

Related Questions

What are typical symptoms of phantom limb?

See below. Phantom limb syndrome is the term for when a person still feels the limb after amputation of that limb. It is thought to be a phenomenon that is generated in the brain by our "map" of that body part that has existed since birth. In most people this phantom fades away with time. In a small number of people, their will be pain in the phantom limb and this is a more difficult situation. Read more...

What is phantom limb?

See below. Phantom limb occurs when someone has an amputation of part of the limb and the person has persistent sensation like the amputated part is still there. This can also happen in people who have spinal cord injury and can no longer feel their extremities. With time, the phantom sensation begins to fade in most people. A small percentage have phantom pain which is much more difficult to treat. Read more...

What's a phantom limb?

Amputation. Following amputation, in some cases, the brain may act as if the loss never occurred, and painful sensations may be felt even though the limb is gone. Read more...

What causes phantom limb?

See below. Phantom limb syndrome is the term for when a person still feels the limb after amputation of that limb. It is thought to be a phenomenon that is generated in the brain by our "map" of that body part that has existed since birth. In most people this phantom fades away with time. In a small number of people, their will be pain in the phantom limb and this is a more difficult situation. Read more...

What is a phantom limb like?

Unreal sensation. When a limb is lost by amputation, the nerves that used to go to the limb still remain as stubs in the stump. They continue to send information to the brain as though they were still connected to the limb. This causes a phantom sensation of feeling from the limb that is no longer there. This is interpreted as pain or severe discomfort. It is hard to treat and hard to understand. Read more...

What is phantom limb syndrome?

It's not there. The brain develops a body MAP very early in life. Nerves to an arm or leg are from a specific region of the brain. If the arm or leg is lost, the nerves still act as though it were there, and the brain still acts as though it were there. This produces a phantom limb sensation. Read more...

What's it mean to have phantom limb?

Feeling a lost limb. The sensation of a limb that has been amputated. Not to be confused with phantom pain, which is an often difficult to treat painful sensation in an amputated limb. Read more...
Phantom Limb. This is often seen in patients that have undergone an amputation. The patient will complain of pain and or feelings to the missing part of the limb. For example, a patient with a big toe amputation will report having pain to that toe. Usually, these symptoms subside with time. Read more...

What predisposes someone to phantom limb?

Bad artery blockage. The most common reason for limb amputation is peripheral artery disease (pad). When an affected limb has so little circulation that it requires amputation the longer the time between having severe pain in the leg and amputation, the more likely phantom limb pain will develop. Amputations for infection or trauma have less incidence of phantom pain but it can happen. Read more...
Common. Having a limb before amputation. Almost everyone who has had an amputation gets phantom limb - the sensation that the limb is still there. It often feels like the limb is longer or shorter than it used to be (telescoping) or that it is at a different angle. This is different from phantom pain, which will affect a smaller % of the people with amputations. Read more...

How is it possible to feel a phantom limb?

See below. Sensation from the body travels from the "outside in" meaning the impulse starts in the limb and travels through nerves to the spinal cord and then into the brain where we "feel". When a limb is amputated, the nerves to that limb are cut the nerves are still in the part of the limb that remains. When they are stimulated, the brain still interprets the impulses as coming from the amputated part. Read more...