What are the symptoms of rectal cancer?

None or bleeding . Anywhere from nothing to bleeding, to pressure or a mass or lump. Don't wait for symptoms. Get checked. Symptoms are a late finding.
Varies. Rectal cancer is similar to colon cancer except that it is in the lower end of the colon. There may be no symptoms in early cases. Depending on the size and location of the cancer, there may be blood in stool, a feeling of fullness in the rectum and desire to pass stool, anemia, weight loss and symptoms from spread to adjoining organs.

Related Questions

What are your first symptoms of colon/rectal cancer?

None. The first signs of colon cancer would be no symptoms at all. Later mild intestinal beeping can occur that is also not visible. Later colon blockage and anemia might occur. Read more...
None. Dont rely on symptoms. Colonoscopy is what to do. Bleeding is a common symptom, but is could be too late. Other could be pain, a mass, cosntipation, weight loss. None of them are specific for colon cancer. Don't wait for symptoms. The screening power of colonoscopy to prevent colon cancer is excellent. Get your colonoscopy. Read more...

I was wondering what are the signs/symptoms of lower bowel/rectal cancer?

See below. Often there are no symptoms in early stages. Signs and symptoms include bleeding, change in bowel habits, occult blood in stool, abdominal pain, intestinal obstruction, anemia and if metastases develop, jaundice and abdominal swelling. See this site for more info. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/rectal-cancer/basics/definition/con-20036554. Read more...

What would be the first symptoms of colon or rectal cancer?

None or bleeding. Most colon and rectal cancers have no symptoms until they either start bleeding (causing anemia - a low blood level), rupture open (perforate), or invade other tissues, causing pain. This is why screening colonoscopy -- to find cancers while they are small, and to remove polyps which grow up to become cancers -- is so important. Go get checked! Read more...
Usually none. The most common symptom in people diagnosed with colorectal cancer is no symptom at all; this is why screening is so important. Most common symptoms are change in bowel habits, weight loss, blood with stools, anemia- but these are late symptoms, and are associated with a poor outcome. Every american should be screened at age 50, sooner if a first-degree relative has had cr cancer or polyps. Read more...
None! Early symptoms of colon and rectal cancer do not exist. That is why screening tests are so important. Simple tests such as checking for blood in the stool can hep identify people at risk for colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy is the gold standard for screening in the usa. Symptoms that may be caused by colorectal cancer include diarrhea, constipation, change in bowel habits and bleeding. Read more...
No symptoms. Unfortunately early colon and rectal cancer will present with no symptoms. This is why it is important to be screened at an appropriate e age. This typically begins at 50 yrs for normal risk individuals. Rectal bleeding can be a sign which is why this should be evaluated by your doctor if present. Read more...

My neighbors say my new doctor tends to overdiagnose everyone. He thinks I might have rectal cancer. Can you tell me the symptoms?

See a specialist. Symptoms can include rectal bleeding associated with your bms, a change in bowel habits, a change in the caliber of your stool, (narrow stools), rectal pain and most important, no symptoms whatsoever. A physician can feel a rectal mass which raises one's suspicion. The diagnosis can be made and confirmed by a colonoscopy performed by a colorectal surgeon or gastroenterologist. Read more...
Very nonspecific! People who develop colon and rectal cancer often do not have any symptoms until the cancer is very large. That is why screening colonoscopy is so important. Symptoms can include rectal blood, pain or pressure in the abdomen or while trying to evacuate stool and even crampy abdominal pain. It is really important if you have symptoms to see your physician or if you are 50 to get scoped! Read more...