4 doctors weighed in:
How do you help babies stay on their back while sleeping?
4 doctors weighed in

Dr. Laura Webb
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Back to sleep
The back to sleep campaign is designed to make sure you always put your baby to sleep on their back, which significantly decreases the risk of sids.
However, by the time your baby can roll over (around 4 months) the risk of crib death is much decreased. Still put your baby to sleep on their back but you don't need to lose sleep worrying if they roll over.

In brief: Back to sleep
The back to sleep campaign is designed to make sure you always put your baby to sleep on their back, which significantly decreases the risk of sids.
However, by the time your baby can roll over (around 4 months) the risk of crib death is much decreased. Still put your baby to sleep on their back but you don't need to lose sleep worrying if they roll over.
Dr. Laura Webb
Dr. Laura Webb
Thank
In brief:
Babies under 4 months old are usually trained to sleep on their back from day 1 of life.
After 4 months old, if baby can roll on its own, you don't need to keep turning him on his back at night. Be sure to place baby on tummy much of waking time to avoid head flattening known as "positional plagiocephaly". Try at least 20 min tummy time 4 times a day and increase as much as possible while awake.

In brief:
Babies under 4 months old are usually trained to sleep on their back from day 1 of life.
After 4 months old, if baby can roll on its own, you don't need to keep turning him on his back at night. Be sure to place baby on tummy much of waking time to avoid head flattening known as "positional plagiocephaly". Try at least 20 min tummy time 4 times a day and increase as much as possible while awake.
Dr. Tammi Schlichtemeier
Dr. Tammi Schlichtemeier
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Dr. James Ferguson
Pediatrics
In brief: Avoid infant positio
The back sleeping position is most important in the first months before your infant begins rolling over. By that time, crib death rates have declined considerably and there is not much you can do if your infant is an active sleeper. Sand bags or positioners were popular in the early 90's but have little value.
Just start the night with baby sleeping on its back.

In brief: Avoid infant positio
The back sleeping position is most important in the first months before your infant begins rolling over. By that time, crib death rates have declined considerably and there is not much you can do if your infant is an active sleeper. Sand bags or positioners were popular in the early 90's but have little value.
Just start the night with baby sleeping on its back.
Dr. James Ferguson
Dr. James Ferguson
Thank
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